Hedieh Mirahmadi on The Plight of Persecuted Christians May Worsen Under Biden

Members of Michigan’s Chaldean community rally against religious persecution in Iraq in 2010. (Paul Sancya/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

President Biden’s recently confirmed UN Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield is unlikely to use her diplomatic muscle to defend Christians against persecution.

If recent remarks by Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield are any indication of her position, the prospects are grim. At the U.N. General Assembly’s commemoration of the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, she reprimanded China and Myanmar for committing genocide against their Muslim minorities and then turned to the issue of racism in the US. After a lengthy introduction about the “original sin” of slavery, she goes on to say, “the senseless killing of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and so many other Black Americans sparked …. a movement that spread across the world: Black Lives Matter. And because Black Lives Matter, we need to dismantle white supremacy at every turn.”[1]  The persecution of Christians in the Middle East and their mass slaughter in countries across Africa were noticeably absent from her remarks.

Promoting religious freedom and thereby preventing persecution of minority religious groups abroad became a fundamental part of U.S. foreign policy through the International Religious Freedom Act, enacted into law in 1998. The law sets up an Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom along with an independent, bipartisan U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) that monitors freedom of religion and belief abroad and makes policy recommendations to the President, Secretary of State, and Congress.

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: Christian Post, Hedieh Mirahmadi

When you purchase a book below it supports the Number #1 Black Christian Newspaper BLACK CHRISTIAN NEWS NETWORK ONE (BCNN1.com) and it also allows us to spread the Gospel around the world.