What You Need to Know About the Leading Coronavirus Vaccines

What You Need to Know About the Leading Coronavirus Vaccines

While two vaccines have been approved for emergency use in the United States, others appear to be close to winning approval for distribution. Here’s what you need to know about the leading brands.

Pfizer

On December 11, 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued the first emergency use authorization to Pfizer for people over age 16. Phase three clinical trials showed it was 95% effective in preventing COVID-19 disease. Recent studies show it carries the same efficacy against the variant first detected in the U.K. As for the variant detected South Africa, it is between 75% and 85% percent effective, although further studies are needed and are ongoing.

The vaccine requires two doses administered 21 days apart. It must be shipped and stored at -94 Fahrenheit, much colder than standard freezers. After thawing, a vial of the Pfizer vaccine must be used within five days.

This vaccine uses messenger-RNA technology. That’s when a portion of genetic code is delivered to the body. That code instructs the cells to make a protein consistent with the coronavirus. As a result, the immune system develops antibodies to fight the disease. Scientists say the genetic code used in this type of vaccine can be relatively quickly and inexpensively modified to adapt to mutations in the virus.

The most commonly reported side effects, which can last several days, are pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, joint pain, and fever. Of note, during trials, more people experienced these side effects after the second dose than after the first dose.

The pro-life Charlotte Lozier Institute reports abortion-derived cell lines were not used in the development or production of the vaccine, but sometimes were used in lab testing.

Moderna

On December 18, 2020, the FDA issued an emergency use authorization for the Moderna vaccine for use in individuals 18 years of age and older.

Phase three clinical trials showed it was 94% effective in preventing COVID-19 disease. Recent studies show it carries the same efficacy against the U.K. variant and is between 75% and 85% percent effective in the South Africa variant. Further studies are needed and are ongoing.

The vaccine requires two doses delivered 28 days apart. It must be shipped and stored at -4 Fahrenheit, which is the temperature of a regular refrigerator freezer. After thawing, it remains stable for 30 days if refrigerated and 12 hours at room temperature.

Like Pfizer, the Moderna vaccine uses messenger-RNA technology (see above). The National Institutes of Health is working with Moderna to make the vaccine more effective against rising variants such as the one first detected in South Africa.

According to the FDA, the most commonly reported side effects, which typically lasted several days, were pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, joint pain, swollen lymph nodes in the same arm as the injection, nausea and vomiting, and fever. Of note, more people experienced these side effects after the second dose than after the first dose.

The pro-life Charlotte Lozier Institute reports abortion-derived cell lines were not used in the development or production of the vaccine, but sometimes were used in lab testing.

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Source: CBN

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