Yali Tribe of Papua New Guinea That Once Killed Two Missionaries Receives 2,500 Bibles and is Now Sharing the Gospel

In 1968, the Yali tribe of Papua New Guinea that practiced witchcraft and cannibalism killed two missionaries. Today, they hunger for the Word of God. | YouTube/Mission Aviation Fellowship

In 1968, the Yali tribe of Papua New Guinea that practiced witchcraft and cannibalism killed two missionaries. Today, they hunger for the Word of God.

In August, the Yali people received 2,500 Bibles delivered by plane from Mission Aviation Fellowship. Some tribe members walked an entire day’s journey to reach the villages where the Bibles were being handed out. Before the plane landed, women swayed and chanted to celebrate the arrival of the Bibles.

“It felt like we were on holy ground. It was a holy moment — one to be remembered,” said Dave Ringenberg, the MAF instructor pilot and director of Papua operations, told MAF.

Among the Bibles delivered, 1,400 were children’s Bibles brought by one of MAF’s eight Papua New Guinea-based aircraft.

“After 20 years of heat, humidity and use, these Bibles wear out,” MAF corporate communications director Brad Hoaglun told The Christian Post. “Like any object that’s heavily used, it has to be replaced.”

The arrival of the Bibles was marked by a celebration complete with dancing, songs, and speeches. Many people might have thought this scene impossible just 52 years ago.

The Yali were once known as the most feared tribe in Indonesia’s Snow Mountains. Short and aggressive, they used their bows to kill other tribesmen and eat them. Even when the tribe wasn’t at war, they hunted people for meat. Few who entered their mountains returned.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Jackson Elliott