WATCH: Miniature Dachshund Frankie Rounds Up his Flock in Short Order

Six-year-old miniature dachshund Frankie takes on the job of a herding dog by rounding sheep into paddocks in Girilambone, New South Wales

A miniature dachshund proved he had nerves of steel when the tiny dog bravely rounded up an entire flock of sheep in Australia.

Charlie Rowlands captured an adorable video of his six-year-old sausage dog Frankie showing his success as a herding dog by rounding up sheep into farm paddocks.

Despite not being a traditional sheep dog, measuring around five to seven inches tall, Frankie easily settles into his new line of work in Girilambone, New South Wales.

The adorable pooch bravely chases the sheep across the pen even though he is outnumbered by dozens of farm animals.

A few of the sheep attempt to make a dash for it away from the gate but the tiny dog still manages to chase down the massive livestock.

Little Frankie gives professional sheep dogs a run for their money even though he does not have the obvious skills of a working dog, the footage captured on September 28 shows.

His owner Mr Rowlands said: ‘Frankie is a six-year-old Mini dachshund. He loves the farm life and in this video is helping move a new mob of sheep out to the paddocks.’

He added that Frankie is a ‘real character’ and loves getting involved with all aspects of farm life, from chasing pigs to mustering sheep.

Unlike sausage dogs, Australian Shepherds are normally recognised as a traditional working sheep dog in New South Wales.

English Shepherds, border collies and kelpies are also considered to be skilled stock dogs and are highly regarded for their obedience.

Dachshunds, on the other hand, are known to be incredibly playful dogs and can have a streak of mischief when they are being trained.

But the short-legged pooches were bred as scent hound dogs to hunt badgers and other tunnelling animals, including rabbits and foxes.

The breed are now considered to be good family dogs, as they are loyal companions, successful watchdogs and are good with children.

SOURCE: Daily Home, Kate Dennett