Barna Report Finds White American Christians Have Become Less Motivated to Address Racial Injustice

Demonstrators participate in the Get Your Knee Off Our Necks Commitment March in Washington D.C. on Aug. 28. 2020. | The Christian Post

White, self-identified Christians in the United States have become less motivated to address racial injustice and are less likely to believe that the country has a race problem compared to last year, according to a new report by the Barna Group.

In findings made public on Tuesday, Barna reported that 33% of white self-identified Christians believe that the United States “definitely” has a race problem, down from 40% last year.

By contrast, 81% of black self-identified Christians agreed that the nation “definitely” has a race problem, up from 75% in 2019. Hispanic self-identified Christians stayed about the same, with 54% responding “definitely” in 2019 and 55% responding the same in 2020.

Barna also found that from 2019-2020, the number of white self-identified Christians who felt “very motivated” to address racial injustice dropped from 14% to 10%.

White self-identified Christians who were “motivated” to address racial injustice also declined from 18% in 2019 to 15% in 2020, with those “not at all motivated” rising from 11% in 2019 to 22% in 2020.

In contrast, from 2019-2020, the number of black self-identified Christians who were “very motivated” to address racial injustice rose from 33% in 2019 to 46% in 2020.

Despite the decrease in motivation to address racial injustice and a drop in the belief that the nation has a race problem, Barna did find an increase in belief among white self-identified Christians that the United States has historically been oppressive to minorities.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Michael Gryboski