Robin Schumacher on The Day a Demon Went to Church

The former senior pastor of my church has a group of other pastors in the city that he collaborates with on sermon material. One of them shared with him a very out-of-the-ordinary occurrence at his church.

A man in their congregation had started disrupting services by standing up and loudly speaking in an unknown language. The pastor took the person into his office and started talking with him when the man suddenly stood up and repeated what he was doing during the service.

The pastor asked the man multiple times to stop but he wouldn’t. Exasperated, the pastor finally said, “In Jesus’ name, stop!”

The guy froze like a statue for a second, looked directly at the pastor, swore at him, and then continued with the same vocalizations.

Although rattled, the pastor had the presence of mind to realize what was in front of him, and said, “In Jesus’ name, tell me what you are saying.” The man stopped again, smiled, and repeatedly said, “I love Satan”.

Demons Today?

The idea of demon activity – at least to most people in twenty-first century America – is something they expect to only encounter in Netflix’s and Amazon’s horror movie streaming services. But in other countries, it’s a different story.

In 2019, the Vatican made headlines for its declarations that exorcism requests were so numerous in Italy and elsewhere that they were dramatically increasing the number of trained exorcists worldwide and starting to offer their training to those outside Catholicism. Books like Matt Baglio’s The Rite chronicled the Vatican’s training and illustrated what awaited those who were skeptical about demon activity occurring today.

Of course, the book and movie that brought demons and exorcism front-and-center decades ago was The Exorcist. What most don’t know is that the book’s author – William Peter Blatty – was motivated to write his famous work for Christian apologetics reasons.

Blatty wrote an article in October 2011 to mark the 40th anniversary of The Exorcist where he said, “If an investigation were to prove that possession is real, what a help it would be to the struggling faith of possibly millions, for if there were demons, I reasoned, then why not angels? Why not God?” Blatty also put to rest the idea that his book was based on the exorcism of a young American boy that occurred in the late 1940s. Instead, Blatty said that The Exorcist was produced from his research on exorcisms performed around the globe.

The point Blatty made is an important one. If un-prejudicial, carefully conducted investigations verify demonic activity and/or possessions, then the conclusions are devastating for the atheistic and naturalistic philosophy positions that assert there is nothing beyond this physical life. Further, the validation that these spiritual entities behave in a manner described in the Bible and obey the authority of Christ lends great support for the truth claims of Christianity.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Robin Schumacher

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