Southern Baptists Organize to Help Amid Coronavirus Crisis

The Send Relief ministry center in Kentucky has sent out supplies to assist other ministry centers across the nation, including 6,000 meals to New York City so they could provide for people who are under quarantine or are restricted to confinement in some way. Photo by Taylor Field

ALPHARETTA, Ga. (BP) — Anxiety in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis continues to mount, but Southern Baptists across the United States are determined to respond and meet needs.

On March 12, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reached out to Southern Baptist Disaster Relief (SBDR) leadership to discuss engaging Southern Baptist volunteers in response efforts on a nationwide scale.

“This is an opportunity for Southern Baptists to be the hands and feet of Jesus, to be the Church,” said Sam Porter, national director for SBDR with the North American Mission Board (NAMB) and Send Relief. “Local state emergency management agencies will reach out to our national SBDR staff, and we will connect those agencies to the appropriate contacts in their state.”

Taylor Field, a pastor and Send Relief missionary in New York City, has seen concern build over the last couple of months. Send Relief is Southern Baptists’ compassion ministry arm.

“We are in a densely populated area. I was amazed at the level of concern and anxiety with those who are most vulnerable, those who don’t have access to medical care and those who don’t have a place to stay,” Field said. “It dominated the conversation weeks ago, and it’s exacerbated now with the restrictions that have been put in place.”

New Yorkers have been told to prepare for a possible order to shelter in place by the city’s mayor. Field’s team has already made adjustments to how they minister and will continue to do so day by day as new guidelines and restrictions go into effect.

One example of those changes is transitioning from organized sit-down meals to grab-and-go meals for those in need. They also set up different tables around their city block where people can receive Bibles, have spiritual conversations and see social distancing exemplified by volunteers.

“Social distancing does not mean disengaging,” Field said. “We have an opportunity as a church. Let’s make those connections and engage with people. We’ve had events canceled. So, we have more time to make connections and engage with those who have needs.”

The Send Relief ministry center in Kentucky has sent out supplies to assist other ministry centers across the nation, including 6,000 meals to New York City to provide for those under quarantine or are restricted to confinement in some way.

In Pittsburgh, the Send Relief ministry center has made similar changes to its practice of distributing meals, transitioning its every-other-week Sunday night meals into drive through or walk through distribution.

“We’re going to get strategic and make sure big crowds aren’t gathering in our building at one time, to make sure we’re responsible while at the same time distributing food to people in need,” said Rob Wilton, the North American Mission Board’s (NAMB) Send City Missionary who provides oversight to Send Relief’s ministry activity in the city.

Through its connection with Pittsburgh’s food bank, the Send Relief ministry center is also working to deliver groceries to the homes of people who are in need and cannot leave their homes.

Adam Sewell, the Send Relief missionary who oversees the daily operations of the Pittsburgh ministry center, is also connecting with churches that can provide household supplies to pair with the groceries from the food bank.

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Source: Baptist Press