Chris Palusky on Six Ways You Can Make a Difference in the World

The views expressed in this commentary do not necessarily reflect those of BCNN1.

One-third of all Americans surveyed stated that they had no desire to adopt, and when asked why, a higher percentage of Christians said they’d “never thought about” adoption, versus non-Christians, according to a 2019 poll conducted by Barna in partnership with Bethany Christian Services.

This is troubling when you realize that in 2018, more than 437,000 children were in the foster care system, with over 125,000 waiting to be adopted – the highest number in over ten years. As Christians, we’re called to serve orphans and widows in our communities, and this is an area that we must not forget. While not everyone is called to adopt, Christians can play a variety of roles caring for “the overlooked or ignored” (Matthew 25:45 MSG).

2018 survey showed that 51% of Americans under the age of 30 believe their generation can change the world; if that sounds low it’s countered by the 38% who believe they’re already changing it. An amazing, passionate, thoughtful, and motivated generation is rising up in our country. In fact, 80% of Millennials (generally, those who are currently in their 20s and 30s) said they might be open to adoption, yet only 5% of all Americans surveyed had either adopted or were in the process of adopting.

Sometimes, even as Christians, when we think about changing the world, we think big, grandiose, abstract thoughts — and that’s not wrong. But I want to challenge Christ followers to start changing their world by taking one small but powerful step to change a child’s world. If you’re wondering how to get started, here are six ideas that make a difference:

1.  Think About Adoption
Simply by reading this article, and maybe doing a quick Google search afterwards, you can bring down the statistic of Americans who have never thought about adoption. Then take it one step further: start a dinner table conversation with family or friends by asking, “Would you ever adopt? Why or why not?” The answer doesn’t have to be yes, because it shouldn’t be a yes for everyone. However, it’s an important conversation that can get us all thinking about children in our community who need a family.

2.  Support an Adoptive Family
Through your church, professional, or social networks, you may be able to identify  someone in your community who has recently adopted. Introducing a child, no matter their age, to a new home and a new family is a challenging – though rewarding – life change. A meal, financial support, toys, clothes, or school supplies might all be a massive help to a family going through the adoption process. Check with the family to ask what kind of support would be most helpful in this time of transition.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Chris Palusky