Charlie Kirk on American Christianity’s New Reformation Against Socialism

The views expressed in this commentary do not necessarily reflect those of BCNN1.

As we head into the New Year, American Christianity is in the midst of a new “reformation” of sorts. Unlike the first one in 1517, this one is not about issues of indulgences and sacraments. Rather, it’s about our great faith’s wrestle with socialism versus individual liberty, and upon that backdrop, what precisely does it mean to live a “good” Christian life.

This question came to a head in many ways on Dec. 19, when Christianity Today published a column by its editor-in-chief, Mark Galli, regarding Democrats’ current efforts to impeach President Trump. As a parting “gift” to Christendom — Galli officially retired on Jan. 3 he concluded that the president is immoral and, as a result:

“Whether Mr. Trump should be removed from office by the Senate or by popular vote next election—that is a matter of prudential judgment. That he should be removed, we believe, is not a matter of partisan loyalties but loyalty to the Creator of the Ten Commandments.”

For those who might not know me — and for those who know me primarily as a political personality — I want to state clearly at the onset that I am an evangelical Christian. I may be very vocal in my public support for conservative principles such as free markets and limited government, but it’s my deep and abiding faith in Jesus Christ that defines me. Everything else, including my political advocacy, flows from this foundational relationship with my Lord and Savior.

It was upon this backdrop that I watched the extraordinary response to Christianity Today unfold, both from those in support and from those who object, perhaps the most significant of which is in the latter camp coming from none other than Franklin Graham, son of CT’s founder, the late Reverend Billy Graham. Graham made it clear his father supported Donald Trump and voted for him in the last election.

While CT used moral sanctimony and self-righteousness as the excuse for their opposition to President Trump, it was nothing more than a smoke screen for their true motivation. Their call for his removal has nothing to do with him being a “bad boy” much less legally culpable for some impeachable crime. CT wants him gone for the same reason an increasingly significant number of Christians in America want him gone; because President Trump believes in America’s first principles and rejects the age-old lie of a socialist utopia that has long tantalized and excited the likes of CT.

The notion that Christ’s teachings somehow prescribe a collectivist form of government is relatively new in the 2000-year history of Christianity. While scholars can argue over various theological inflection points over the last two millennia, it is clear that more recent forms of liberation theology and social justice movements, specifically those within the Roman Catholic Church in the latter part of the 20th century, have played a pivotal role in forming a more general Christian belief that the affairs of the state and the duties of the Christian man or woman out to be brought together as one.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Charlie Kirk