Amanda Tyler on How We Can Protect Prayer in Schools Without Blessing Christian Nationalism

Public school students participate in school-organized prayer in New York in 1972. The initial U.S. Supreme Court ban on state-sponsored prayer came on June 25, 1962. State provisions for recitation of the Lord’s Prayer and devotional reading of the Bible were barred a year later. Voluntary prayer encouraged by school boards was outlawed in 1971. Times of voluntary prayer outside of class hours and conducted by students without any degree of encouragement from officials or teachers today takes place in some areas. RNS file photo

Amanda Tyler is executive director of BJC, the Baptist Joint Committee for Religious Liberty, an 84-year-old organization committed to preserving faith freedom for all people. The views expressed in this commentary do not necessarily reflect those of BCNN1.


When President Donald Trump leaked, at a rally for evangelical supporters in Florida on Jan. 3, that his administration would issue guidance about prayer in public schools, he started a mini-firestorm, and not just among the fired-up crowd.

When the guidance was released on Thursday (Jan. 16), however, it turned out to be hardly worth the excitement. According to long-settled legal and constitutional protections for religious expression in the public schools, public school students are free to pray, wear religious clothing and accessories and talk about their beliefs. Religious groups can meet on school grounds, and teachers can teach about religion as an academic subject. Religious liberty, in short, is already a treasured value in our nation’s public schools.

So why are the president and White House staffers making inflammatory and misleading statements, claiming our constitutional rights are under attack?

It could be that the administration simply wanted to remind public schools of their constitutional duties. But some comments officials made before and in their announcement of the guidance vastly overstated the supposed problem and echoed the claims of Christian nationalism, a dangerous movement that harms both Christianity and the United States by implying that to be a good American, one must be Christian.

Christian nationalists often point to two Supreme Court cases from the 1960s, Engel v. Vitale and School District of Abington Township v. Schempp, to claim that the government “banned school prayer” or “took God out of the schools.” These are harmful misrepresentations. These cases didn’t ban the free exercise of Christian worship. They banned mandatory Bible readings and prayers written by the government. It should not be controversial to oppose government-dictated religious practice.

Instead of enforcing government-mandated religion, these Supreme Court cases ensured that public school students are free to exercise their constitutionally protected religious beliefs and affirmed the proper way to handle religion in public schools.

And it’s worked: For decades, public schools across the nation have modeled how religiously diverse populations can build relationships of trust and care, respecting the unique role that religion plays in people’s lives. Like our neighbors of all faiths, we are empowered by the First Amendment to live our beliefs in the public square, which includes the public school.

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Source: Religion News Service