Wooden Cross Made from Wreckage of the Titanic Goes on Auction in UK

The cross made from the wreckage of the Titanic will now go up for auction on October 19 at Henry Aldridge and Son in Devizes, Wiltshire, a world-renowned auction house which specializes in Titanic artifacts. | Henry Aldridge and Son

A wooden cross made from oak taken from the Titanic and crafted as a “mark of respect to those lost” is up for auction in the U.K. later this month.

The cross was made by Samuel Smith, a carpenter on the ship S.S. Minia, which was one of the vessels that recovered the bodies of Titanic victims in April 1912, the BBC reports.

According to the outlet, crew from the S.S. Minia picked up debris from the Titanic as they retrieved the bodies. Smith made the cross from some of that wreck wood to honor the more than 1,500 passengers and crew who died when the ship struck an iceberg.

The piece has remained in Smith’s family, but will now go up for auction on Oct. 19 at Henry Aldridge and Son in Devizes, Wiltshire, a world-renowned auction house which specializes in Titanic artifacts. The cross has a pre-sale estimate of $14,755 to $22,132.

Auctioneer Andrew Aldridge told Fox News that the artifact is “incredibly powerful and poignant.”

“The cross made from wreck wood from Titanic is without doubt one of the most powerful and emotive pieces of memorabilia of its type I have ever auctioned,” he said, according to the Belfast Telegraph.

“The provenance is fantastic, we literally know the timeline of where this has been since the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Leah MarieAnn Klett