Stacey March on Instead of Banning Secular Entertainment from My Children, Here’s How I Approach It

Twenty One Pilots

Even though I’m no stick-in-the-mud when it comes to popular (“secular”) music, admittedly I had some religious guilt as we sat first row mezzanine waiting for the concert to begin.

With the kind of frenzy only a teenage girl can possess, my daughter has a slightly manic obsession with the band Twenty One Pilots. Besides the occasional choice words and schoolboy obsession with themselves, I have to admit I rather like their music too. It’s hip, fun, imaginative, and man, that drummer.

The concert was a gift for my daughter’s thirteenth birthday, but instead of being excited about this experience for her, questions about my mothering indiscretions besieged my mind:

“Is this really how I should be ushering my daughter into her teenage years?”

“Will this lead her away from Jesus?”

“Does Jesus mind that we’re here?”

“Are we doing anything wrong?”

I began to take inventory as I sat there in the dark, shrouded by lights and beats and video images, thinking about another wildly popular British band my kids introduced me to called The 1975. Instantly hooked by their sound, I decided to find out more about who they were. That’s when I came across an interview of their lead singer, Matt Healy, who said:

“I want salvation just as much as the next person; I envy the faithful. If there’s anybody who’s actually got some good evidence on all this God sh–, give it to me, ‘cuz now’s the time I will eat it up.”

The entertainment industry could easily be considered the most influential pillar of culture in the world today. Its arms reach wide across such areas as politics, business, religion, education, and the family. Those who have risen to the top carry easily a weight of presence in any field of their choosing: think Oprah Winfrey’s effect on Barack Obama’s candidacy in the presidential campaign of 2008, the significance of which has been studied scrupulously for years.

Not only does Hollywood have enormous influence over culture at large—often prophesying where it will go even—but it disciples generations of young people every day through its endorsements or denouncements of social movements, thought systems, politicians, products, mental health issues, religious beliefs, and life values, just to name a few.

As I thought about the music discipling my daughter and the artists behind it, I had two choices: to turn my back on the industry and forbid its influence in our home or face it head on and teach my kids to call upon what God could do.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Stacey March