Michael Brown Says Three of His Ministry’s Videos Were Removed from Vimeo Because of a ‘Mean-Spirited Vibe’

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Last week, we received a notice from Vimeo that three of our videos had been removed for allegedly violating community guidelines. When we appealed, we were informed that, “We don’t allow videos that are hateful, harass others, violate someone’s privacy, or include defamatory or discriminatory speech.” And how, exactly, does Vimeo determine which videos cross this line? You’re in for a surprise.

But before I share the rest of the Vimeo guidelines, allow me to address the perennial critics who will say, “Stop bellyaching. If you don’t like how Vimeo operates, go somewhere else.”

To those critics I reply, “This is not about our videos, which are uploaded onto several sites, including YouTube and Bitchute. It’s about Vimeo’s policies, which are part of the larger issue of ambiguous social media guidelines. Let’s focus on that.”

The Vimeo rep, named James, explained that, “Specifically, Vimeo moderators will generally remove videos that: Make derogatory or inflammatory statements about individuals or groups of people; Are intended to harm someone’s reputation; Have an overall mean-spirited vibe.”

Let’s put aside the unclear nature of the opening line (the words “specifically” and “generally” are a bit contradictory). And let’s forget, for the moment, that rather than our videos making “derogatory or inflammatory statements about individuals or groups of people,” we were exposing others who did this very thing.

What if Vimeo moderators concluded that these three videos were “intended to harm someone’s reputation”? What, exactly, does that mean?

What if we posted a video detailing the atrocities committed by Kim Jong-un? Would that fit into this category? What if we posted a video exposing a contemporary white supremacist?

Or, on a less extreme level, what of the countless videos posted by Christian critics about other Christian leaders whom they consider heretics? Are any (or all) of these videos “intended to harm someone’s reputation”?

But these two categories pale in comparison with the third one, namely, videos that “have an overall mean-spirited vibe.”

What in the world does this mean?

How does one quantify this?

What is the precise, non-emotive definition of “vibe”?

I would hate to stand before a judge one day and hear him say, “While I can’t cite any definitive evidence against you, I’m feeling a ‘guilty’ vibe.”

Really? Decisions based on a vibe?

And what specific, tangible, measurable, consistent guidelines are given to the moderators to help them determine what, exactly is an “overall mean-spirited vibe”?

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Michael Brown