Baptist Pastor from Myanmar Faces Imprisonment for Telling Trump About Government’s Religious Persecution During Visit to White House

Pastor Hkalam Samson

A Baptist minister from Myanmar who spoke with President Donald Trump about being “oppressed and tortured by the Myanmar military government” during a visit to the White House could be prosecuted for his comments. 

Pastor Hkalam Samson, president of the Kachin Baptist Convention and a leading rights advocate for a predominantly Baptist ethnic group in northern Myanmar known as the Kachin, was part of a group of international religious leaders that recently met with the president to express concerns about religious freedom in their home countries.

“As Christians in Myanmar, we are oppressed and tortured by the Myanmar military government,” Samson said. “We don’t have chance, many, for religious freedom.”

During his 60-second speech, the pastor also thanked Trump for imposing sanctions on four top generals for their role in a campaign against ethnic Muslims and called on the U.S. government to focus on bringing “general democracy and federalism” to his country.

Now, Lt. Col. Than Htike, is seeking to prosecute Samson for his criticism of the country’s military, according to the New York Times. The colonel’s complaint accuses Samson of “knowingly giving false information” and notes that the minister’s remarks were posted on the Facebook page of ABC News, violating Myanmar’s “criminal defamation laws.”

A judge is expected to rule next week on whether the case can proceed. If found guilty, Samson could face several months or years in prison.

“There is no freedom of expression for Myanmar citizens wherever you are because you can get in trouble even when you talk about the truth in the White House,” Samson told the Times.

Over the last three years, the country’s military has filed dozens of defamation complaints against its critics, mainly over comments they posted on Facebook. All of the complaints have been brought by colonels.

Samson said the legal process was a big improvement over decades of military impunity in ethnic areas such as Kachin State, when critics of the military would simply vanish.

“If the military was not happy with what we said, they wouldn’t file a lawsuit,” he said. “They would take you anonymously and you would disappear anonymously.”

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Leah MarieAnn Klett