How a Former NSA Scientist Helped Covenant Eyes Make It Nearly Impossible for People to View Porn Undetected

Covenant Eyes Chief Data Scientist Michael Holm (R) poses for a picture after being presented with the Plagioclase Award from Covenant Eyes President Ron DeHaas (L) at the 2018 Covenant Eyes Christmas party in Owosso, Michigan. Holm was honored for his contributions toward Covenant Eyes’ Screen Accountability software. | Covenant Eyes

The pornography accountability service Covenant Eyes released this year a new software principally designed by a former National Security Agency data scientist that makes it nearly impossible for users to take advantage of loopholes in order to view pornography undetected. 

As hundreds of thousands of people have used Covenant Eyes to hold themselves accountable since the company’s founding in 2000, the organization switched its entire offering over to its new “Screen Accountability” software in March.

The new software is billed as a “revolutionary screen monitoring technology” that is a “radical new approach to accountability” and vastly more effective than the company’s old system, which relied on text-based detection through web browsers.

As the way people use the internet is constantly changing, the company’s new detection software uses an image-based detection system that can detect pornographic images and videos regardless of their source, online or offline: an encrypted web browser, a mobile app, an external flash drive or even a Microsoft Word document.

“The software sees the screen just as you see it,” Covenant Eyes Chief Data Scientist Michael Holm told The Christian Post in a recent interview. “The battleground has moved from the heavily-hampered world of network text-parsing right up to the visual input to your eye.”

Holm started working for Covenant Eyes in 2014 after serving three years as an applied research mathematician for the NSA, a federal agency headquartered in Maryland.

Holm began working for the NSA in 2011 after earning a doctorate in mathematics from the University of Nebraska. He said he desired to be part of a mission bigger than himself and to get a start in the competitive industry. He found his work at the NSA to be “purposeful and valuable.”

However, desiring to move his family back to the Midwest where most of his extended family lives, Holm began investigating new job opportunities about three years into his employment with the federal intelligence agency.

He explained that he was initially offered and came close to accepting a position as a
data scientist for the multinational corporation Walmart, which has over 11,000 stores
worldwide.

But the very weekend that Holm intended to accept the job offer, the Walmart recruiter happened to be away at a conference, and during this time, Holm was informed by his wife about a job opening at the Michigan-based Covenant Eyes.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Samuel Smith