Christian Chinese Family Escapes to Taiwan, Recounts Details of Life Under Brutal Communist Crackdown

BEIJING, CHINA – JUNE 16: Chinese Hui Muslims gather before Eid al-Fitr prayers marking the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan at the historic Niujie Mosque on June 16, 2018 in Beijing, China. Islam in China dates back to the 10th century as the legacy of Arab traders who ventured from the Middle East along the ancient Silk Road. Of an estimated 23 million Muslims in China, roughly half are Hui, who are ethnically Chinese and speak Mandarin. China’s constitution provides for Islam as one of five ‘approved’ religions in the officially atheist country though the government enforces severe limits. Worship is permitted only at state-sanctioned mosques and proselytizing in public is illegal. The Hui, one of 55 ethnic minorities in China (along with the Han majority), have long nurtured a coexistence with the Communist Party and is among the minority groups with political representation at various levels of government. The Hui Muslim population fast from dawn until dusk during Ramadan and it is believed there are more than 20 million members of the community in the country. (Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

A Christian family from Early Rain Church in China that fled to safety in Taiwan is speaking out for the first time about the terrifying crackdown against Christians in the communist nation.

According to a striking report from the Associated Press, 49-year-old Liao Qiang and his 23-year-old daughter said they were living under 24/7 surveillance after their church was deemed not to be sanctioned by the government.

From the AP report:

“Liao and Ren’s account is the first detailing what has happened since the detentions began at the Early Rain Covenant Church. It shows the determination of the Chinese government — and the lengths it has gone — to eradicate a congregation that has long been a thorn in its side.”

Early Rain made headlines thanks to pastor Wang Yi, who defiantly remained steadfast in his faith despite being detained last year. Yi particularly annoyed the communist powers that be by doing things such as holding annual prayer services to remind people about Tiennamen Square, despite the governments best efforts to effectively remove that event from existence.

Liao’s daughter (Ren) explained that Early Rain members had to report their location to authorities while making thinly veiled threats.

“That’s when I knew it was no longer safe for us here, and that my children were most in danger,” he told AP after a recent church service.

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SOURCE: Faithwire, Dan Andros