Michael Brown: Why I Do Not Celebrate LGBT Pride

If you ask my detractors, they would tell you that the reason I do not celebrate gay pride is that I’m a bigot. A hater. A homophobe. A transphobe.

And I understand their perspective.

After all, no matter how Christian I claim to be, if I tell a gay couple I do not believe they are truly married in God’s sight, that feels like hatred to them.

If I tell a woman who identifies as a man that I still believe she is a woman, that feels like hatred to her.

From their perspective, I can understand how unchristian my position seems, how bigoted, how biased, how primitive.

After all, they would be quick to point out, there are gay parents who are more devoted to their kids than some straight parents.

There are transgender men and women who are kind, gentle, caring souls.

There are people all across the LGBT spectrum who help the poor, who care for the oppressed, who love the loveless, who are outstanding bosses or employees or friends or neighbors.

Why shouldn’t all of us celebrate gay (or, LGBT) pride?

For me, there are three major reasons, and none of them have anything to do with hatred or fear.

First, I do not accept the categories of LGBT as fixed and definite categories, worthy of special recognition.

Put another way, why should there be a special month to celebrate people based on their sexual desires and romantic attractions? Or based on their gender identity perceptions?

The very fact that we’ve gone from G (as in gay) to LG, to LGB, to LGBT, to LGBTQ, to LGBTQI to LGBTQIP (and beyond) indicates that these are hardly fixed categories.

Or, to zero in on the letter B, why should I celebrate someone who is attracted to both males and females? Why should I put them in a special category (like Hispanic or Asian or Black)?

If the person happens to a courageous firefighter, I’ll celebrate them for that. If the person happens to be a cancer survivor with an amazing story, I’ll celebrate them for that.

They are fellow human beings, and if they deserve honor or commendation, I’ll gladly give that to them. But I won’t celebrate their bisexuality. Why should I?

And that leads to my second point.

If I’m convinced that homosexual practice is contrary to God’s design, why should I celebrate it?

If I personally know people whose same-sex attractions were the result of childhood sexual abuse and rape, why should I celebrate those attractions?

If I’m convinced that, ideally, a child should have a mommy and a daddy (rather than two mommies or two daddies), why should I celebrate a family setting that willfully deprives that child of either their mother or father?

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Michael Brown