Medical University of South Carolina Begins Study to Focus on Rising Suicide Rate Among Black Children

Kasandra Alexander lost her oldest son, Jaylan, to suicide when he was just 17. He was seeking help from church, as many do. (WCIV)

The subjects of mental illness and suicide historically are taboo in the African American community, spanning generations.

But two Lowcountry mothers are fighting to change that, as suicide rates are on the rise in the black community among children under the age of 12.

Two moms we spoke with who lost their sons to suicide know that heartache all too well.

Adrienne Willis-Haynes lost her son Willie after taking him to therapy, and finding him help.

Unfortunately, it just wasn’t enough.

A mom of three, Kasandra Alexander, lost her oldest son Jaylan when he was just 17.

He was seeking help from church, as many do.

Building on a recent study that found African American children commit suicide at twice the rate of white children, MUSC started a study in 2018 about the effects of stress and trauma on black children.

Researchers have been working to recruit more children and families to participate.

Click here to read more.
Source: ABC News 4