Jerry Newcombe: What is This Opposition to ‘Thoughts and Prayers’?

A police officer stands guard in front of the Masjid Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, Sunday, March 17, 2019, where one of two mass shootings occurred. New Zealand’s stricken residents reached out to Muslims in their neighborhoods and around the country on Saturday, to show kindness to a community in pain as a 28-year-old white supremacist stood silently before a judge, accused in mass shootings at two mosques that left dozens of people dead. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Lately, wishing someone your “thoughts and prayers” has become supposedly meaningless—as if it is a substitute for actually doing something positive.

After last week’s horrific shooting in a mosque in New Zealand, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (AOC) sent out a tweet: “At 1st I thought of saying, ‘Imagine being told your house of faith isn’t safe anymore.’ But I couldn’t say ‘imagine.’ Because of Charleston. Pittsburgh. Sutherland Springs. What good are your thoughts & prayers when they don’t even keep the pews safe?”

The condemnation of “thoughts and prayers” is not unique to AOC.

• Some of the Parkland school victims were also down on “thoughts and prayers”—if viewed as a substitute for action (which usually translates to strict gun control laws in an effort to turn the rest of the world into Chicago).

• Christian actor Chris Pratt was attacked by the politically correct crowd for asking for prayers  for the health of a movie director who suffered a heart attack.

• After living through a shooting in a newspaper in the greater Washington, D.C. area and hearing that the president and first lady said their “thoughts and prayers” were with the victims, one survivor used the f-word to say she resented such prayers if not accompanied by action.

It reminds me of what Saul Alinsky, author of Rules for Radicals and one of the key intellectual mentors of President Obama and Hillary Clinton, once said this about prayer: “[When someone] doesn’t do a d— thing but pray for mankind…when that person comes up for judgment…the judge is gonna’ sit there and say…‘You cruddy b—–d’.”

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Jerry Newcombe