Are Christian Leaders More Likely Than Others to Engage in Sexual Sin?

Are Christian leaders more likely than others to engage in sexual misconduct? To the extent that they are truly Christian, the answer is certainly no. But to the extent they are still human, the answer is that all too many have fallen here. And because of their leadership role, their sin is all the more damaging. How many trusting parishioners have been injured for life?

Recent days have brought a fresh spate of charges against Southern Baptist leaders and Catholic leaders.

In the circles in which I travel – most frequently Charismatic and Pentecostal – there have been some very public, infamous scandals. That’s why I devoted a whole chapter to the subject of sexual immorality in my book Playing with Holy Fire: A Wake-up Call to the Pentecostal-Charismatic Church.

To be clear, I did not write the chapter with a self-righteous, holier-than-thou attitude. Quite the contrary. I live by the kindness of God 24/7, and I’m the last one to throw stones, knowing full well that “there go I but for the grace of God.”

As for those who have fallen, the last thing I want to do is heap further condemnation on their heads. I’m all for restoration, knowing that our God is a redeemer.

It’s also important to remember that for every leader who falls there are far more who do not fall. There are plenty of God-fearing, God-loving, men and women of integrity who practice what they preach when it comes to sexual morality.

But the question remains: Why do so many fall? And, if we’re honest with ourselves, what kind of weaknesses lurk within our own souls?

In my book – again, with an emphasis on Pentecostal-Charismatic circles, which account for at least 500 million believers today – I laid out some of the principle reasons we fall into sexual sin.

Here’s an abbreviated version, adapted from the book:

1) Idolatry. Throughout the Bible, where you find idolatry, you find immorality, and the ultimate idolatry is the idolatry of me. It’s the mentality that says, “The world revolves around me. I draw attention to myself. I am an object of people’s worship and adoration. God may be important, but so am I.”

Certainly, this sounds extreme, but when you are hailed as the anointed man of God, when multitudes hang on your every word, when you are more of a superstar than a servant, when your name becomes more prominent than the name of Jesus, idolatry is near. And with idolatry there is immorality.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Michael Brown