More Evidence That Men and Women Are Not the Same: New Study Shows Having Children Changes Women’s Brains

Sure, it looks cute now, but a new study explores why babies influence their moms’ DNA for years. (PeopleImages/iStock)

Are men and women that different? The answer assumed by much of our culture is, “no.” But any woman who’s had a baby knows better.

The idea, driven into our culture by the forces of the sexual revolution, that men and women are basically the same with very few minor, external differences is now largely taken for granted. What I call the “gender revisionist” movement is at full steam. Some parents are now even attempting to raise their babies as “theybies,” which means not “assigning” a male or female gender to their children until they’re old enough to choose it for themselves.

The problem with the new gender fad is that science keeps reminding us that men and women are profoundly different. And that we should be thankful for this.

A recent essay in the Boston Globe highlighted just how visible this difference is at the neurological level. Using modern imaging technology, researchers can peer inside the brains of expectant and new mothers, and they’ve witnessed the unique and life-altering changes that occur.

This remarkable new “discovery” comes as no surprise to women who have experienced pregnancy. Chelsea Conaboy, for example, confessed in the Globe article that her tendency to be a worry-wart ramped up after having her son.

Of course, for some women, these changes can be extreme and lead to depression, and require treatment. But for the vast majority, the motherhood metamorphosis is healthy and essential. It helps mold women, as Conaboy explains, into “fiercely protective, motivated” caregivers, “focused on…baby’s survival and long-term well-being.”

And we’re now discovering that what’s at the root of this transformation is a radical restructuring of the brain that occurs in nearly all women when they become mothers.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, John Stonestreet And G. Shane Morris