Paul Ryan Says House, Senate Have Reached Deal on Dodd-Frank Rollback

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) said Tuesday that the House and Senate have struck a deal to pass the upper chamber’s bipartisan bill to roll back strict financial rules enacted by former President Obama.

Ryan told reporters at the Capitol that the House will hold a vote on the Senate bill targeting the Dodd-Frank Act in exchange for the Senate taking up a package of bills from the House Financial Services Committee.

“We’ve got an agreement on moving different pieces of legislation, so we will be moving the Dodd-Frank bill,” Ryan said.

Ryan didn’t say when a vote would take place, if it would happen before Memorial Day or what House bills the Senate would take up. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who controls the House floor schedule, said he would announce when the lower chamber will vote on the Senate bill “soon.”

The Senate in March passed a bipartisan bill to exempt dozens of banks from the stricter Federal Reserve oversight under Dodd-Frank and scores more from lending restrictions and reporting requirements. The deal, sponsored by Senate Banking Committee Chairman Mike Crapo (R-Idaho), passed by a 67-31 vote with support from more than a dozen Democrats.

A deal between the House and Senate would clear the way for Congress to pass the biggest changes to the Dodd-Frank financial rules since the law was enacted in 2010. The House and Senate have squabbled over the Senate bill, which Ryan vowed to freeze unless the Senate agreed to add provisions from the House to it.

House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas) said he was “excited that our negotiations over the last few weeks have culminated in the Senate agreeing to vote on our House bills.”

Spokespeople for Crapo and Democratic senators who sponsored the bill declined to comment on Ryan’s remarks.

House Republicans who passed a sweeping rewrite of Dodd-Frank last year initially said the Senate’s bill didn’t go far enough. Hensarling, the architect of that effort, in March said that the Senate bill would stay on Ryan’s desk unless the Senate agreed to amend it.

Hensarling had pushed to add to the Senate bill several dozen Financial Services Committee measures meant to boost small business lending and investment. Those bills passed with little to no Democratic opposition.

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SOURCE: The Hill, Sylvan Lane