Drama in Patriots Paradise: Belichick Cuts Privileges of Brady Associate Alex Guerrero

Alex Guerrero has been a Patriots sideline presence in the past, but not this season. (Jim Davis, Boston Globe / 2015)
Alex Guerrero has been a Patriots sideline presence in the past, but not this season. (Jim Davis, Boston Globe / 2015)

In 2013, as Tom Brady and Alex Guerrero prepared to launch their TB12 therapy center, Bill Belichick made clear during a sports medicine symposium that he trusted the medical and training staff the Patriots already had in place. He credited the team’s staff with helping to win the franchise’s first three Super Bowls.

In the years after, Belichick allowed many of Brady’s teammates to participate in training regimens not with the Patriots’ highly regarded medical and training staff, but at the TB12 Center just outside of the stadium in Patriot Place. Guerrero treated the players there with his alternative methods, and the TB12 Center billed the Patriots for his services.

Belichick also permitted Guerrero, Brady’s close friend and business partner, to secure his own office near the Patriots locker room, fly on the team charter to road games, and receive credentials to work the sidelines of every game, home and away.

But this season the Patriots coach has reversed course. For reasons he has declined to explain, Belichick weeks ago stripped Guerrero of his special team privileges, restoring a measure of tradition to the team’s medical and training operation, according to several people familiar with the Patriots’ internal operations.

Guerrero is now banned from boarding Patriots jets. His sideline access has been revoked. And he no longer is permitted to treat players other than Brady in his exclusive office at Gillette Stadium.

The development has created some friction in Foxborough, where Belichick and Brady have collaborated over 18 years to help create the first great football dynasty of the 21st century, sources said. But the coach and quarterback, in keeping with their tradition, have refused to publicly address a potentially distracting topic, in this case Guerrero’s diminished status.

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SOURCE: Bob Hohler
The Boston Globe