The National Black Church Initiative Authorizes the Mobilization of 7,000 Churches in Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Mississippi to Assist the Hurricane Victims of Houston and Surrounding Counties

Black and White Churches Swing into Action

The National Black Church Initiative (NBCI), a faith-based coalition of 34,000 churches comprised of 15 denominations and 15.7 million African Americans, has authorized 7,000 churches in Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Mississippi to assist the churches and families of Houston and surrounding affected counties. This means that NBCI churches in those states will begin to collect food, clothing, money and other needed items. We are developing what we are calling our essential list of items. We are coordinating our actions with other local and state authorities, the Salvation Army and the American Red Cross. NBCI wants to avoid the mishaps that has occurred during Katrina and other disasters concerning the unethical practices of the American Red Cross. We have instituted safeguards which we have developed after those disasters concerning the practices of the American Red Cross.  We did this in response to the thousands of complaints from our churches over eight years ago. In addition, there has been independent investigations of those practices of the American Red Cross. We will no longer give cash directly to the American Red Cross but we will work with them.

Rev. Anthony Evans, President of the National Black Church Initiative, says, “many of our African American pastors who are preparing to deliver the goods and services outlined in our list of items needed are beginning to address and prepare their congregations over the next two weeks. This is not just for the short-term but for the long-term. My executive staff has outlined a preliminary two-year plan to assist all churches and families in the affected areas. We project that we will serve up to 65,000 families over the next two years. Critical to this approach is to assure those pastors (both black and white) that the American Red Cross will play a strategic role and not an essential one when it comes down to the implementation of the service delivery of this plan. The churches will not be collecting cash and sending it to the American Red Cross/The Clinton Foundation because of the deeply unethical practices demonstrated during the last several major disasters particularly 9/11, Katrina and the Haitian earthquake.

NBCI will also initiate our transportation network comprising of 5,000 church vans to deliver the goods and services outlined by this extraordinary initiative. We implemented the same network during Katrina. This transportation network will be initiated once the water begins to recede. In the meantime, I have asked all our participating churches to begin to collect all needed items as outlined by our faith command leader in the south and southwest.

ABOUT NBCI

The National Black Church Initiative (NBCI) is a coalition of 34,000 African American and Latino Churches working to eradicate racial disparities in healthcare, technology, education, housing, and the environment. NBCI’s mission is to provide critical wellness information to all of its members, congregants, Churches and the public. Our methodology is utilizing faith and sound health science.

NBCI’s purpose is to partner with major organizations and officials whose main mission is to reduce racial disparities in the variety of areas cited above. NBCI offers faith-based, out-of-the-box and cutting edge solutions to stubborn economic and social issues. NBCI’s programs are governed by credible statistical analysis, science based strategies and techniques, and methods that work. Visit our website at www.naltBlackChurch.com.

Rev. Anthony Evans
President
National Black Church Initiative
Baby Fund Project
P.O. Box 65177
Washington, DC 20035
202-744-0184
www.naltblackchurch.com

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