New Barna Survey Shows 10% of Americans Hold Biblical Worldview Even Though 100 Million Adults Claim to Be Christians

(Photo: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)
A woman reads from the Book of Joshua during the 27th Annual U.S. Capitol Bible Reading Marathon in Washington, May 2, 2016.

Only 10 percent of Americans hold a distinctly biblical worldview even though 46 percent, or nearly 100 million adults in the United States, claim to lead a Christian life.

In surveys published Monday by the American Culture and Faith Institute, seven out of 10 Americans called themselves Christians, but relatively few were able to answer questions about the Bible and Christian beliefs.

“Our research collected information about attitudes and behaviors related to practical matters like lying, cheating, stealing, pornography, the nature of God, and the consequences of unresolved sin,” said researcher George Barna, who directed the studies.

“That’s what makes the discrepancy between the percentage of people who consider themselves to be Christian — more than seven out of every 10 — and those who have a biblical worldview — just one out of every 10 — so alarming.”

Barna noted that every person does have a worldview, however.

“The critical question is which one people have embraced,” he said. “If we want to transform our culture then we will need to change the choices people make that produce that culture. And in order to change those choices we must identify the beliefs that led to those choices.”

The ACFI researchers interviewed 6,000 people from three groups: the general public, theologically conservative Protestant ministers, and what they call “Spiritually Active Governance Engaged Conservative Christians” which they have been tracking since 2013.

The questionnaire included 20 “Christianity 101” questions about basic spiritual beliefs and 20 others assessing behavior. The researchers then reviewed respondents’ answers to the 40 questions “in relation to biblical content and the number of biblically consistent answers was tallied for each respondent.”

Only 4 percent of young people ages 18–29 scored 80 percent or better, qualifying as “integrated disciples” by the researchers.

Click here to read more

Source: Christian Post | BRANDON SHOWALTER