New York Fashion Week Gets Political Over Trump

Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour, designer Mara Hoffman, Bob Bland and Carmen Perez pose before the Mara Hoffman show. (Photo: Robin Marchant)
Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour, designer Mara Hoffman, Bob Bland and Carmen Perez pose before the Mara Hoffman show. (Photo: Robin Marchant)

There’s no escaping political discourse these days. From the Grammys stage to the runways of New York, artists are using their respective platforms to express their views on President Trump and his administration.

At New York Fashion Week, some designers have created a space for escapism, but many jumped into the political fray.

Perhaps the most noticeable political expression was in the form of pink pins with the slogan “Fashion Stands with Planned Parenthood.” The pins graced the lapels of Anna Wintour, Diane von Furstenberg and Tracy Reese, just a handful of the 40 plus designers who agreed to support the provider of reproductive health services.

Reese, who frequently dressed Michelle Obama as first lady, took things a step further at her presentation Sunday, and asked four female poets to read verses from their work, focused on women’s experiences, as models posed in her clothing.

Designer Mara Hoffman, known for her brightly printed bikinis and maxi dresses, participated in the Women’s March on Washington last month and invited March organizers to give opening remarks at her show. The women read part of the Women’s March mission statement and quoted Maya Angelou, whose Phenomenal Woman played as models walked and danced in Hoffman’s new collection.

Naeem Khan also decided to use poetry on his runway Tuesday, utilizing Maya Angelou’s Human Family.

“The variety of our skin tones can confuse, bemuse, delight, brown and pink and beige and purple, tan and blue and white,” the poem reads. “We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike.”

Project Runway alum Christian Siriano channeled Depeche Mode on his runway Saturday, invoking their famous song People are People in a statement T-shirt and playing the tune as a cast of models, diverse in both size and ethnicity, took their final turn on the catwalk.

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SOURCE: Cara Kelly
USA TODAY