Donald Trump Again ‘Thanks’ Black People Who Did Not Turn Out to Vote

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At another of his “thank you” rallies on Thursday night, Donald Trump expressed his deep gratitude to the black voters who didn’t turn out to vote last month.

“We did great with the African American community,” he said, during the rally in Hershey, Pa. “So good. Remember — remember the famous line, because I talk about crime, I talk about lack of education, I talk about no jobs. And I’d say, what the hell do you have to lose? Right? It’s true. And they’re smart and they picked up on it like you wouldn’t believe. And you know what else? They didn’t come out to vote for Hillary. They didn’t come out. And that was a big — so thank you to the African American community.”

The crowd applauded.

Trump offered similar praise last week in Michigan — another of the states that he wasn’t expected to win, but did. The black community “came through big league,” he said then. “If they had any doubt, they didn’t vote. And that was almost as good,” he added.

It’s not the case that Trump did particularly well with black voters. Exit polling shows that he got the lowest level of support from black voters of any Republican in the last four decades — except for those Republicans running against the first black president of the United States. He got less support from black voters than George W. Bush did in 2004, for example.

But as you can see from that chart, the percent of the electorate that was black dipped this year, down to 12 percent from 13 percent four years ago.

If we compare the change in voter turnout in each county with the percentage of the county that’s black, the pattern is pretty obvious, especially through the Deep South.

Both nationally and in the states that made the difference for Trump — Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, which he won by a combined 80,000 votes — there’s a clear correlation between the density of the black population in a county and the shift in turnout.

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SOURCE: Philip Bump 
The Washington Post