Saudi-Led Airstrikes Kill at Least 60 People in Yemen

People recover the body of a man at a prison struck by Saudi-led coalition airstrikes in the city of Hodeida, in Yemen, on Sunday. At least 60 people were killed and dozens injured in the attack. (PHOTO CREDIT: Abduljabbar Zeyad/Reuters)
People recover the body of a man at a prison struck by Saudi-led coalition airstrikes in the city of Hodeida, in Yemen, on Sunday. At least 60 people were killed and dozens injured in the attack. (PHOTO CREDIT: Abduljabbar Zeyad/Reuters)

Airstrikes carried out late Saturday by a Saudi-led military coalition killed at least 60 people at a security complex in Yemen that housed prisoners and staff, the country’s Houthi rebels said Sunday.

Three strikes occurring near midnight targeted a prison building in the complex in Hodeida, a Houthi-controlled city on the western coast, the Houthis’ official Saba News Agency said Sunday, citing a local government source. In addition to the dead, 38 people were wounded, it said.

Pictures published by Saba showed several bloody corpses lined up next to each other on the ground. Jets could still be heard overhead on Sunday afternoon, residents said, and people were afraid of going near the rubble to rescue people.

The strikes were be the latest in a string of recent deadly attacks, some of which have ratcheted up international pressure on the coalition to end its 19-month war in Yemen.

Coalition spokesman Brig. Gen. Ahmed Asiri said coalition aircraft were targeting a central security building that was used by the Houthis and their allied forces as a control center.

“The coalition forces leadership stresses that targeting protocols and procedures were followed fully,” he said.

An investigatory body affiliated with the coalition found on Oct. 15 that it wrongly targeted a funeral in a strike that killed 142 people, one of the deadliest tolls of the war. Saudi coalition airstrikes have been blamed for a large portion of the more than 10,000 people the United Nations estimates have died since the war started.

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SOURCE: Wall Street Journal, Asa Fitch and Saleh Al-Batati