Mike Pence Campaigns in Utah

Republican vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during a rally Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, in Salt Lake City. Pence has a campaign swing through the West with stops in Nevada, Utah and Colorado as he stumps for the Republican presidential ticket two weeks before the election. (PHOTO CREDIT: AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Republican vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during a rally Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, in Salt Lake City. Pence has a campaign swing through the West with stops in Nevada, Utah and Colorado as he stumps for the Republican presidential ticket two weeks before the election. (PHOTO CREDIT: AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

With just 13 days to go until the election, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence touched down in an unusual location for a Republican vice-presidential candidate: Utah, a deeply conservative state that hasn’t voted for a Democrat for president since 1964.

That Pence came here reflected a growing worry that one of the most reliably Republican-voting states, with six electoral votes, has turned into a three-way dogfight involving Republican Donald Trump, Democrat Hillary Clinton and independent conservative candidate Evan McMullin.

“We are all knotted up in Utah, we are all knotted up in America and we’re going to drive it all the way to the finish,” Pence told a rowdy crowd at the Infinity Event Center here.

Since early October, after the release of tapes showing Trump talking crudely about women, influential Republicans from this heavily Mormon state, including Sen. Mike Lee and Rep. Jason Chaffetz, have denounced the nominee and said they’d support someone else. Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee and a Mormon who now lives in Utah, did so months ago.

Neither Lee nor Chaffetz has said who that would be, but McMullin is bidding for the chance. A clutch of recent statewide polls have found Trump’s lead shrinking to single digits, and an internal Democratic poll taken this week in the state’s most competitive congressional district found Trump falling to third place there.

“I’m not helping Donald Trump get elected,” McMullin told MSNBC on Monday during a campaign swing through Wyoming. “Donald Trump is a terrible candidate. Of course, he’s going to have a hard time winning.”

Still, few Republican office­holders have endorsed McMullin. Those who have bolted the ticket have courted backlash from the majority of Republican voters who back it.

“The people who un-endorsed Trump — look, you created this narrative,” James Evans, Utah’s GOP chairman, said in the party’s downtown office. As he spoke, a young volunteer wearing a Mike Lee shirt placed a massive Trump-Pence sign in a window — then, realizing that a reporter was watching, joked about turning the shirt inside out.

On Monday night, in advance of Pence’s visit, dozens of Trump supporters packed a meeting room at Provo’s main library for a “town hall” on the state of the campaign. It had been organized by Easton Brady, Trump’s state campaign director, not yet 20, and it gave pro-Trump Republicans space to vent about the media and the McMullin candidacy.

“It’s Mitt Romney’s fault!” growled Lyman Momeny, a local activist, who said he would be writing in Evans’s name in place of Republicans who un-endorsed Trump. “He wants people to vote for his puppet!”

Nathan Herbert, the son of Utah Gov. Gary R. Herbert (R) — who is on the ballot this year — led some of the discussion and tried to calm nerves about party division. His father, he suggested, was not going to pile on Trump. There was, he insisted, a “moral case” to make for Trump, and no reason for religious voters to be ashamed.

“In these books, and in our scriptures, were men of sin,” said Kimberly Lee, a local activist. “And what did God do? He takes imperfect men, and he helps them to create his will and his way.”

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SOURCE: The Washington Post, David Weigel

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