900 Churches Expected to Combat ‘Spirit of Divisiveness’ In America With 2016 Election Day Communion Service

(PHOTO: REUTERS/JOHN GRESS) A parishioner cries as he signs a song of worship in the 7,000-seat Willow Creek Community church during a Sunday service in South Barrington, Illinois, November 20, 2005.
(PHOTO: REUTERS/JOHN GRESS)
A parishioner cries as he signs a song of worship in the 7,000-seat Willow Creek Community church during a Sunday service in South Barrington, Illinois, November 20, 2005.

Churches across the country will be holding communion services on election day this year as part of an ecumenical effort to combat the “spirit of divisiveness.”

Known as Election Day Communion, the observance was first held in 2012 and had approximately 900 congregations from diverse denominations take part.

“We watched the rancor and bitterness of this election reach new highs (and new lows). We’ve seen that spirit of divisiveness seep into our communities, our neighborhoods, even our churches,” stated the EDC’s website.

“This year more than ever we need to remind ourselves where our true hope is found. We need to participate in holy acts of union and reconciliation. We need to declare our allegiance to Jesus, the prince of peace.”

The event is organized by the Peace and Justice Support Network, a ministry of the Mennonite Church USA’s Mennonite Mission Network.

Jason Boone, coordinating minister for the Peace and Justice Support Network, told The Christian Post that the observance is centered on “the Church being the Church on election day, gathering at the Lord’s table to remember, to practice, to give thanks for, and to proclaim its allegiance to Christ.”

“Election Day Communion began in 2012 with a concern that Christians in the United States are being shaped more by the tactics and ideologies of political parties than by their identity in and allegiance to Jesus,” said Boone.

“As this election cycle began to heat up, we heard from folks across the country asking if it was happening again. With the dynamics of this election being heightened compared to 2012, it was an easy decision to bring EDC back.”

Boone also told CP that as of Tuesday, more than 100 churches have signed up and that number is increasing as Nov. 8 draws closer.

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: The Christian Post
Michael Gryboski