Vanderbilt University to Pay Daughters Of The Confederacy $1.2 Million to Rename Memorial Hall

The United Daughters of the Confederacy donated $50,000 in 1933 to build Confederate Memorial Hall, which was then on the campus of the George Peabody College for Teachers. VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY
The United Daughters of the Confederacy donated $50,000 in 1933 to build Confederate Memorial Hall, which was then on the campus of the George Peabody College for Teachers.
VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

Vanderbilt University has settled a long-running lawsuit so it can rename Confederate Memorial Hall. The school will pay $1.2 million to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which is considered present day value of the original $50,000 donation more than 80 years ago.

Vanderbilt tried to rename Memorial Hall in 2002, but the Daughters of the Confederacy sued, arguing breach of contract. The Tennessee Court of Appeals ruled that Vanderbilt could only drop the name if it paid back the money. The school opted to save the $900,000 “rather than enrich an organization whose values it does not share,” states a press release from 2015.

But Chancellor Nick Zeppos says the time has come to move on.

“As our university and nation evolve, we are hardly ever perfect, and the solutions are hardly ever perfect,” he told WPLN.

“The residence hall bearing the inscription Confederate Memorial Hall has been a symbol of exclusion, and a divisive contradiction of our hopes and dreams of being a truly great and inclusive university,” he said in a statement. “It spoke to a past of racial segregation, slavery, and the terrible conflict over the unrealized high ideals of our nation and our university, and looms over a present that continues to struggle to end the tragic effects of racial segregation and strife.”

Zeppos says Vanderbilt is not trying to whitewash its past or avoid difficult questions. He sees the renaming as being true to the original vision of Cornelius Vanderbilt, who wanted to contribute to healing following the Civil War.

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Source: Nashville Public Radio |  BLAKE FARMER