Sunday Adelaja, Controversial Founder and Pastor of One of Europe’s Largest Churches, Admits to Having Multiple Affairs With Parishioners

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Sunday Adelaja loses leaders at Kiev’s Embassy of God for not heeding their discipline.

The controversial founder of one of Europe’s largest Protestant churches is battling some in his church leadership over his reaction to multiple affairs.

Sunday Adelaja, a Nigerian pastor who leads the charismatic Embassy of the Blessed Kingdom of God for All Nations in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, has admitted to having affairs with parishioners. The confession came one month after he posted a video on his blog titled “Sexual Sin Is Not Enough to Take You to Hell.”

The female parishioners revealed the affairs to other area pastors, who then took the information public, according to the Council of Bishops of Christian Evangelical Churches of Ukraine. (English version here.) The leaders warned Ukrainian Christians about Adelaja, also noting previous allegations that he bilked investors of $100 million in a Ponzi scheme called King’s Capital.

Earlier, a website called ZimEye claimed to have exposed Adelaja by having an undercover reporter pose as a “prophet” and secretly record a February phone call with the pastor. The elders of Embassy of God publicly dismissed the report as a prank.

“If you have listened to the audio recording which was fraudulently obtained, you will notice that Pastor Sunday never once admitted to any wrong doing as the caller was suggesting in his prophetic utterances,” stated the elders. “It was the prophet that was rather putting words into Pastor Sunday’s mouth. If Pastor Sunday had anything to hide he would not have taken the call with his wife present.”

The elders—which include Adelaja’s wife Bose and three others—noted that Adelaja has already acknowledged that he “has had several sexual challenges and has by God’s grace being able to overcome them.”

“Pastor Sunday has always shared with the world that he is in a position to help minister to the world only because he himself has had his own share of trials including sexual trials, problems and victories,” stated the elders.

Then last month, Adelaja confessed to the affairs at a meeting of more than 200 pastors. He was “defrocked” and removed from preaching (among other leadership duties) after confessing to “fornication,” according to the Russian Union of Christians of Evangelical Faith (ROSHVE).

“Although we have had a long time to notice warning signs in the life and ministry of this man, what we talked about and to him personally and publicly in official statements of the Union, we did not want until the last moment to believe that there are such serious sins in his life,” the Spiritual Board of ROSHVE wrote. They questioned whether Adelaja’s affairs might have been covered up by those close to him.

“We have serious questions to the ministers, who were and are members of the Council of the Apostles and the elders of the church ‘Embassy of God,’ to the closest aides and deputies [of Adelaja], about their actions (or rather—of the criminal inaction) in this situation,” the board wrote. “After all, the timely and rigorous exposure could prevent this tragedy!”

In a Russian-language press release on March 24, ROSHVE stated that Adelaja would enter a season of “recovery.”

An Embassy of God administrator told CT that the church has not issued a public statement because it is “regarded as an inside matter.” The administrator said Adelaja has voluntarily “decided to step down” for six months due to the recent accusations and the ongoing “strenuous lawsuit” over King’s Capital.

He was also planning to move from Ukraine to Nigeria. “He needs this time to recuperate and prepare,” said the administrator.

The six months would also be “enough time” for some critics within the church to “cool down and find answers.”

But Adelaja’s Facebook and blog have remained active, and neither they nor the church’s website mentions the sabbatical.

Several of those close to him have accused him of thwarting attempts to help or discipline.

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SOURCE: Christianity Today
Jeremy Weber