People of Faith Put Forth Big Effort to Ease Flint’s Water Crisis

Flint resident Ruby Adolph carries bottled water and a replacement water filter she received at a fire station in Flint, Mich., on Jan. 13, 2016. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Flint resident Ruby Adolph carries bottled water and a replacement water filter she received at a fire station in Flint, Mich., on Jan. 13, 2016. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

Catholic Charities is giving out water and food. The Flint Jewish Federation is collecting water and water filters. And the Michigan Muslim Community Council has distributed more than 120,000 bottles of clean water for Flint, Mich.

But these faith organizations are also focused on a longer-term goal: to make sure the impoverished city, where President Obama last weekend declared a state of emergency over its poisoned water, is never so neglected again.

“The most important role the church can have is to be the ethical watchdog for the welfare of the community,” Bob Bruttell, chairman of the InterFaith Leadership Council of Metropolitan Detroit, said Tuesday (Jan. 19).

Religious people — from black congregations within the majority African-American city to evangelicals hundreds of miles away — have responded with time, money and other donations to alleviate the water crisis threatening Flint, where officials had long declared its discolored water safe to drink.

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SOURCE: Lauren Markoe 
Religion News Service