In New Book, Craig Groeschel Shares How Christians Can Follow Jesus In a Selfie-Centered World

hash-tag-struggles

There are unintended, negative consequences with many things, and technology isn’t excluded from that, as a Christian pastor discusses in a new book.

Craig Groeschel is a pastor and author of the new book #struggles: Following Jesus in a Selfie-Centered World. Groeschel told American Family Radio on Wednesday that the book is based on some of his own struggles, as well as what he’s seeing in culture today.

“A selfie is when people turn their cameras or phones and take a picture of themselves,” he explained. “There are estimates that there are about 93 million selfies taken a day. A recent article said that girls 15 to 24 years old spend about seven hours a week taking selfies – and if you look at what people are posting all over the place, we’re becoming a selfie-obsessed world.”

Pointing to a 2010 study from the University of Michigan, Groeschel says there has been a drastic decline of empathy. “The results of that … study show that we care about 40 percent less about people than we did in the 1980s, and decline in empathy coincides with the rise of social media,” he said.

Groeschel adds that there are different theories on why there is such a decline in empathy.

“One is simply that we are more obsessed with ourselves,” he says. “We are self-centered. In social media, someone may take a selfie or post a picture on social media and then immediately go back to see if someone liked it or commented on it.

“Another theory is that we’re seeing so much suffering that we’re desensitized to it. I might scroll through my social media feed and I might see a recipe for guacamole, followed by a football player beating up his girlfriend, followed by a cat video, followed by a reporter being beheaded somewhere. They all take up about the same amount of real estate on my phone and my brain doesn’t know how to distinguish which one is more important than the other.”

 

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: OneNewsNow
Chris Woodward