These Interview Questions Are Actually Illegal

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THESE QUESTIONS CROSS THE LINE
Hiring managers use the job interview to learn as much about the candidate as possible. To do that, they ask lots of questions — including ones that may seem harmless, but are completely illegal.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey conducted by Harris Poll, a whopping 20% of 2,192 hiring and human resource managers in the US indicated they have asked a candidate an illegal question. What’s worse, when the group of over 2,000 hiring managers was shown a list of illegal questions and asked whether they were legal, at least 33% said they weren’t sure.

While laws regarding job interview questions vary by state — some specifically prohibit certain questions, while others merely prohibit discrimination based on their answers — it’s important to know when you might be crossing the line.

We compiled the following list of illegal interview questions, which are often mistaken as appropriate, from CareerBuilder, Lori Adelson, a labor and employment attorney for employers and the founding member of Adelson Law, and Joan K. Ustin & Associates, a consultant firm specializing in human resources and organization development.

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN ARRESTED?
Federal law doesn’t stop states from asking about criminal history, but some states make it illegal to ask about your arrest record.

Depending on the state, a conviction record shouldn’t automatically disqualify you for employment unless it substantially relates to your job. For example, if you’ve been convicted of statutory rape and you’re applying for a teaching position, you will probably not get the job.

ARE YOU MARRIED?
Although the interviewer may ask you this question to see how much time you’d be able to commit to your job, it’s illegal because it reveals your marital status and can also reveal your sexual orientation. However, in many states, it’s still legal to discriminate based on sexual orientation.

WHAT RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS DO YOU PRACTICE?
Employers may want to ask you this to see if your lifestyle interferes with work schedules, but this question reveals your religion and that’s unlawful.

They can ask you if you’re available to work on Sundays or, even better, what days are you available to work.

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Source: Business Insider | Jacquelyn Smith