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Oklahoma State University Diversity Coordinator Lawrence Ware Writes Op-Ed In ‘New York Times’ on Why He Is Leaving the Southern Baptist Convention

The first time I was called a nigger to my face was by a fellow camper at a Southern Baptist Convention retreat near Oklahoma City. I was 13, and it was 1995. Devastated, I complained to a counselor who suggested I pray for the ability to turn the other cheek.

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Finally, Jackie Robinson’s Faith Is Getting the Attention It Deserves

Two books shine a long-overdue spotlight on the Christian convictions of the man who broke baseball’s color barrier. (more…)

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Mississippi Legislative Black Caucus Demands White Representative Resign Over Lynching Comment

Black lawmakers in Mississippi are demanding the resignation of a white colleague who said Louisiana leaders should be lynched for removing Confederate monuments. (more…)

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions Reportedly Interested In Reopening Old Civil Rights Cases After Meeting with Emmett Till’s Cousin

According to Ebony, Attorney General Jeff Sessions has met with Emmett Till’s cousin Deborah Watts to discuss encouraging the D.O.J. to reopen old civil rights cases. According to Watts, Sessions said “no one gets a pass.” (more…)

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March 21 — This Day in History: Selma to Montgomery March Begins

In the name of African-American voting rights, 3,200 civil rights demonstrators, led by Martin Luther King Jr., begin a historic march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capitol at Montgomery. Federalized Alabama National Guardsmen and FBI agents were on hand to provide safe passage for themarch, which twice had been

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Claude Lewis, Pioneer Journalist and Co-Founder of the National Association of Black Journalists, Dies at 82

Claude Lewis, co-founder of the National Association of Black Journalists passed away from complications of diabetes at age 82 on Thursday according to the organization. (more…)

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Anthology Album Reflects the Social Consciousness of Harry Belafonte

March 1 marked the 90th birthday of singer and activist Harry Belafonte, and he celebrated with the release of an anthology album that underscores a portion of his life’s work fostering racial harmony. Belafonte, the first artist of any race or gender to sell 1 million records with his 1956

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Remembering the African American ‘Shoebox Lunches’

The great American road trip occupies a special place in the popular imagination. For lovers of Kerouac novels, it’s a romantic rite of passage; for others, it’s the chance to explore nature’s amazing bounty on a shoestring budget or cement lasting friendships. Whatever the reason for setting off, the iconic

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Remembering Culinary ‘Hidden Figure’ Freda DeKnight – a Titan of African-American Food

“It is not an accident that there is a blackout on the Black man’s contributions in America.” Dr. Melvin Chapman (1928-2015), educator, Detroit, Mich. (more…)

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View the 6 Historic Properties Preserved In Honor of Black History

From the works of visionaries like Frederick Douglass and Martin Luther King Jr. to the cruel realities of slavery, African-Americans have played a major role in U.S. history, and below are several historic sites that were pivotal for major heroes and heroines in the black community before, during and after

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North Carolina A&T Dean of Research Joseph Graves Jr., says Teachings of Dr. King Have ‘Never Been More Relevant’

The members of the predominantly white Guilford Park Presbyterian Church had just finished a book study and Sunday school class on race relations when someone in the group suggested a special reading of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” (more…)

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James Baldwin, the Church, and Injustice

On February 3, 2017, Raoul Peck’s critically acclaimed documentary “I Am Not Your Negro” will debut in theaters across the nation, introducing a new generation to the prophetic voice of James Baldwin. The film considers American race relations through the lens of Baldwin’s unfinished novel “Remember This House.” (more…)

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White Woman Who Caused Emmett Till’s Brutal Murder Admits That She Lied

The brutal murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till has haunted and horrified decades of Americans. The story goes that in 1955, when Chicago native Till was visiting family in Sumner, Mississippi, he allegedly whistled at Carolyn Bryant, the wife of a white man, Roy Bryant. Till said something "unprintable," Carolyn told

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