Introducing the Christian Standard Bible with Trevin Wax – Rainer on Leadership #314

Podcast Episode #314

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Released just this month, the Christian Standard Bible is optimal point for accuracy and readability. Trevin Wax joins us to shed light on this new translation and highlights some of its unique characteristics.

Some highlights from today’s episode include:

  • When selecting a Bible, you shouldn’t have to choose between accuracy and readability.
  • The CSB Translation team went through every verse and asked if it’s as accurate and as readable as possible.
  • Capitalization of divine pronouns can often force a translator into making theological decisions.
  • “We should be grateful for the wealth of biblical resources we have.”
  • The CSB is a translation that is solid enough for scholars and easy enough to read for new Christians.
  • “The response to the CSB has been overwhelmingly positive.”
  • Not all Bible translations are stewarded by Christian organizations—the CSB is.

The points we discuss with Trevin are:

  1. The philosophy of optimal equivalence
  2. Changes from HCSB to CSB
  3. Putting CSB on the map in relation to other translations
  4. We shouldn’t have to choose between word-for-word and dynamic
  5. CSB is a great primary translation because it’s an optimal blend of accuracy and readability
  6. Ultimately, we want more people reading the Bible

Episode Sponsors

Vanderbloemen Search GroupVanderbloemen Search Group is the premier pastor search firm dedicated to helping churches and ministries build great teams. They’ve helped hundreds of churches just like yours find their church staff and are uniquely geared to help you discern who God is calling to lead your church.

Find out more about Vanderbloemen Search Group by visiting WeStaffTheChurch.com.


mbts_banner1_rainerMidwestern Seminary, one of the fastest growing seminaries in North America, exists to train leaders For The Church. The local church is God’s “Plan A” for the proclamation of the gospel, and there is no Plan B. And this is Midwestern’s vision and heartbeat—equipping pastors and other ministry leaders who are called to expand God’s mission in the world through the local church. At Midwestern Seminary: they train leaders ‘For The Church.’

Visit them online at MBTS.edu and start your ministry training today.


Feedback

If you have a question you would like answered on the show, fill out the form on the podcast page here at ThomRainer.com. If we use your question, you’ll receive a free copy of Who Moved My Pulpit?


Resources Mentioned in Today’s Podcast

  • Christian Standard Bible – This link contains all the information for all the Bibles mentioned in today’s episode.

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Urgent Church: Nine Changes We Must Make Or Die

It broke my heart.

Another church closed. This church had unbelievable potential. Indeed, it had its own “glory days,” but only for a season. But, 10 years ago, few would have predicted this church’s closure. Today, it is but another statistic in the ecclesiastical graveyard.

I know. We don’t compromise doctrine. I know. We must never say we will change God’s Word.

But many of our congregations must change. They must change or they will die.

I call these churches “the urgent church.” Time is of the essence. If changes do not happen soon, very soon, these churches will die. The pace of congregational death is accelerating.

What, then, are some of the key changes churches must make? Allow me to give you a fair warning. None of them are easy. Indeed, they are only possible in God’s power. Here are nine of them:

  1. We must stop bemoaning the death of cultural Christianity. Such whining does us no good. Easy growth is simply not a reality for many churches. People no longer come to a church because they believe they must do so to be culturally accepted. The next time a church member says, “They know where we are; they can come here if they want to,” rebuke him. Great Commission Christianity is about going; it’s not “y’all come.”
  2. We must cease seeing the church as a place of comfort and stability in the midst of rapid change. Certainly, God’s truth is unchanging. So we do find comfort and stability in that reality. But don’t look to your church not to change methods, approaches, and human-made traditions. Indeed, we must learn to be uncomfortable in the world if we are to make a difference. “We’ve never done it that way before,” is a death declaration.
  3. We must abandon the entitlement mentality. Your church is not a country club where you pay dues to get your perks and privileges. It is a gospel outpost where you are to put yourself last. Don’t seek to get your way with the music, temperature, and length of sermons. Here is a simple guideline: Be willing to die for the sake of the gospel. That’s the opposite of the entitlement mentality.
  4. We must start doing.  Most of us like the idea of evangelism more than we like doing evangelism. Try a simple prayer and ask God to give you gospel opportunities. You may be surprised how He will use you.
  5. We must stop using biblical words in unbiblical ways. “Discipleship” does not mean caretaking. “Fellowship” does not mean entertainment.
  6. We must stop focusing on minors. Satan must delight when a church spends six months wrangling over a bylaw change. That’s six months of gospel negligence.
  7. We must stop shooting our own. This tragedy is related to the entitlement mentality. If we don’t get our way, we will go after the pastor, the staff member, or the church member who has a different perspective than our own. We will even go after their families. Don’t let bullies and perpetual critics control the church. Don’t shoot our own. It’s not friendly fire.
  8. We must stop wasting time in unproductive meetings, committees, and business sessions. Wouldn’t it be nice if every church member could only ask one question or make one comment in a meeting for every time he or she has shared his or her faith the past week?
  9. We must become houses of prayer. Stated simply, we are doing too much in our own power. We are really busy, but we are not doing the business of God.

Around 200 churches will close this week, maybe more. The pace will accelerate unless our congregations make some dramatic changes. The need is urgent.

Hear me well, church leaders and church members. For many of your churches the choice is simple: change or die.

Time is running out. Please, for the sake of the gospel, forsake yourself and make the changes in God’s power.

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Pray for Lighthouse EPC

Location: Mooresville, North Carolina

Pastor: Ken Chivers

Weekly Worship: 10:30 AM, Eastern

Fast Facts: Lighthouse EPC was planted in 2000 in the Lake Norman area of Mooresville, NC. Its original name was Lake Norman Fellowship, but after the founding pastor left in 2014 to be a part of a missions group to pastors in Zambia, the congregation of 55 members renamed the church to Lighthouse in an effort to represent how they are to take the gospel to the community. The name change came in conjunction with a renewed emphasis on outreach to the community with much reliance on the Spirit. Please pray as they launch neighborhood prayer walks and outreach events this year. Also pray for the elders at Lighthouse EPC as they reevaluate every facet of the church in order to be a Great Commission church.

Website: LighthouseEPC.org


“Pray for . . .” is the Sunday blog series at ThomRainer.com. We encourage you to pray for these churches noted every Sunday. Please feel free to comment that you are praying as well.

If you would like to have your church featured in the “Pray for…” series, fill out this information form..

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Notable Voices and the Week in Review: March 25, 2017

Earlier this week at ThomRainer.com:

 


Six Lessons Learned Ministering in a Blue-Collar Community Craig Thompson

For a long time, I struggled with some of my blue-collar guilt until I realized that God had put me in a position to minister well among this blue-collar crowd. These are my kind of people. I understand them and amazingly, they seem to understand me. As a result, I have worked to overcome my false guilt and to tap into the riches of my background that enable me to better minister among the people to whom God has called me. Here are some lessons I’ve learned:

 


Four Questions You Must Ask Yourself Before Hiring a FriendArt Rainer

At first, it seems like a great idea. You know him, trust him, and like being around him. What more could you want? This is the mindset many fall into when presented with the opportunity to hire one of their friends. They imagine their friend only increasing the happiness of their work environment. And for a while, it may. Unfortunately, bringing a good friend on to the team does not always work out well. How do you know if you are making the right decision when such an opportunity presents itself? Here are four key questions you must ask yourself before hiring a friend:

 


Five Realities About the Weight of PastoringEric Geiger

When the apostle Paul listed all his sufferings, he concluded the list with referencing his burden for the churches he served. The weight of pastoring, though filled with immense joy, was a weight that topped Paul’s list of suffering.

Besides everything else, I face daily the pressure of my concern for all the churches. Who is weak, and I do not feel weak? Who is led into sin, and I do not inwardly burn? (2 Corinthians 11:28-29)

Notice a few of the words Paul uses: face, daily, pressure, concern, sin, inwardly, burn. With those words in view, here are five realities about the weight of pastoring.

 


Are You Confusing Leadership and Control?Michael Hyatt

Aspiring leaders would do well to stop focusing on control and figure out how to expand their influence. Here are four ways you can become a person of influence, no matter your position in your organization:

 


Why Ministry Is DiscouragingDarryl Dash

Discouragement is simply part of ministry. I don’t know a pastor or church leader who doesn’t occasionally struggle with discouragement. “Discouragement is an occupational hazard of the Christian ministry,” said John Stott. “It is not necessary by quotations from the biographies of eminent ministers to prove that seasons of fearful prostration have fallen to the lot of most, if not all of them,” observed Spurgeon. If you’re in Christian ministry, prepare to be discouraged at least some of the time. Why is ministry discouraging? Three reasons.

 


When a Minister Helps to Kill a MinistryJim Martin

Unfortunately, many other ministers start out well but then make one of three fatal errors which often brings a ministry to an end. In this case, the problem wasn’t a cantankerous elder or harassment from a segment of the congregation. Rather, in this case, this minister made three mistakes which are often fatal to to a ministry.

 


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Eight Easter-Related Church Trends – Rainer on Leadership #313

Podcast Episode #313

SUBSCRIBE: iTunes • RSS • Stitcher • TuneIn RadioGoogle Play

Easter is only three weeks away, so today we cover a few trends we are seeing in churches as we lead up to Resurrection Sunday. Also, we talk pants splitting, camels falling, and sets burning.

Some highlights from today’s episode include:

  • If your worship center is already at +70% capacity on Sundays, you might consider adding a service on Easter.
  • Churches should be taking advantage of Facebook advertising for Easter.
  • Facebook advertising is the most effective and cost efficient advertising churches have available to them.
  • The purpose behind high attendance invite days is to show members that people will come when invited.
  • Should you have an Easter sunrise service? It depends.
  • Do what is effective for your church; don’t just do what other people do.
  • Try something special and unique with your Easter guest follow-up.

The eight Easter trends we discuss are:

  1. Adding services
  2. Adding venues
  3. Facebook advertising
  4. Special emphasis for inviting
  5. Tradition is contextual – Sunrise services, egg hunts, etc.
  6. Involvement in community Easter activities
  7. Cantatas are still popular for churches with choirs
  8. Special follow up emphases.

Episode Sponsors

mbts_banner1_rainerAre you getting prepared for the changing ministry landscape? Get your Master of Divinity degree at Midwestern Seminary. The M.Div—Midwestern’s flagship degree program—is their primary track for ministry preparation. At just 81 hours, the Midwestern M.Div offers a complete foundation for full-time ministry leaders, offering everything you need, and nothing you don’t. Join other students in vibrant Kansas City as you train in a unique collaborative environment focused on the local church or study online in your current ministry context. Midwestern Seminary is developing a new culture of discipleship devoted to the local church and committed to taking God’s unchanging Word into a rapidly changing world. Join the movement today.

Find out more at mbts.edu/mdiv.


Vanderbloemen Search GroupVanderbloemen Search Group is the premier pastor search firm dedicated to helping churches and ministries build great teams. They’ve helped hundreds of churches just like yours find their church staff and are uniquely geared to help you discern who God is calling to lead your church.

Find out more about Vanderbloemen Search Group by visiting WeStaffTheChurch.com.


Feedback

If you have a question you would like answered on the show, fill out the form on the podcast page here at ThomRainer.com. If we use your question, you’ll receive a free copy of Who Moved My Pulpit?


Resources Mentioned in Today’s Podcast

Easter Set Catches on Fire

Click here to read the full / original blog post.

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