Grammy-Nominated Rapper Nipsey Hussle Shot to Death in L.A. Outside His Clothing Store; Two Others in Serious Condition

The Grammy-nominated rapper Nipsey Hussle was killed in a shooting outside his clothing store in Los Angeles on Sunday afternoon, multiple law enforcement sources said. Two other men were in serious condition, and a suspect remained at large.

Police sources said Hussle was shot multiple times at Marathon Clothing on Slauson Avenue in South Los Angeles at about 3:20 p.m. and that he was pronounced dead at a hospital. No other information was immediately available, but just a couple of hours before, Hussle, 33, whose real name was Ermias Ashgedom, had tweeted, “Having strong enemies is a blessing.”

A large crowd of people, many of them crying, gathered at the intersection as police and media helicopters whirred overhead.

One of them was Matthew Talley of Denver, the engineer and director known as Megatron.

“It ain’t just Los Angeles. He was an inspiration that was bigger than Los Angeles,” Talley said. “You see all these people out here? …

“He was really cool,” Talley said. “He was a dope individual every time I met him.”

Hussle’s debut studio album, “Victory Lap” was nominated for Best Rap Album at this year’s Grammy Awards.

Hussle had long been associated with the Rollin 60s Neighborhood Crips, one of Los Angeles’ largest street gangs, which he publicly acknowledged in a 2010 interview with Complex magazine.

In more recent years, however, Hussle had developed an interest in technology and community development, and he was part of a team of artists and entrepreneurs who developed Destination Crenshaw, an open-air museum devoted to honoring African-American artistic achievement.

“In our culture, there’s a narrative that says, ‘Follow the athletes, follow the entertainers,'” he told the Los Angeles Times last year. “And that’s cool, but there should be something that says, ‘Follow Elon Musk, follow [Mark] Zuckerberg.’

“I think that with me being influential as an artist and young and coming from the inner city, it makes sense for me to be one of the people that’s waving that flag,” he said.

Hussle was also an investor in Vector 90, a co-working space in South Central Los Angeles, where young people can take classes in science, technology and mathematics. He called the center a “bridge between Silicon Valley and the inner city,” saying at last year’s Afrotech conference that he hoped to expand to other cities, like Atlanta, Washington and Baltimore.