WATCH: Former Congresswoman Michele Bachmann Gives Her Thoughts on Today’s Cultural Issues and How Christians Can Bring Biblical Answers to Their Communities

I recently sat down with Michele Bachmann, former congresswoman from Minnesota and former presidential candidate, to glean her insight on the cultural moment we are living in and how Christians can bring biblical answers to our communities.

She pointed out that above even political issues, there is one key cultural issue that Christians must take notice of before entire generations are affected.

“If you look at the movies that are available on a plane, the movies that are available on Netflix, if you look at Amazon, or the offerings on TV channels, it causes your heart to take a deep pause,” Bachmann said.

Content that most Americans considered taboo — even just a decade ago — and would never imagine being appropriate to show on television or across mass media platforms is now largely accepted, even considered mainstream. There even seems to be an unspoken race among content creators to see who can push the envelope the fastest and in the most shocking way.

Bachmann sums the situation up simply, “My greatest concern is for little children. For years we were taught that it was normative in this country to have what was called in loco parentis.”

The phrase she uses here is Latin for “in the place of a parent.” By that she means that the institutions of this nation once saw it as their duty to stand in the place of parents to protect the innocence of children. That was considered a normative, a vanguard, a gold standard for the United States.

Bachmann suggests that entertainment and media companies today seem to give no thought to protecting the innocence of children, but instead more about “violating” them. She told me she is deeply concerned about the next generation because “you can’t unring a bell.”

For example, many children are being exposed to pornography at an alarmingly early age, some as young as 7 or 8. Our youngest are simply incapable of dealing with the information they’re ingesting. That type of illicit content “alters the brain for a little child,” Bachmann points out. “That’s what we really need to be concerned about,” she said, “what our little kids are ingesting — and it’s not good.”

The Congresswoman and I agree. We have to get far more serious about protecting little children. If we are failing to protect the innocence of our children, what can practically be done to address this eroding cultural problem?

Bachmann provides an answer, and her own example of being a mother and foster parent speaks volumes. “There are opportunities all around you if you open up your eyes,” she encouraged.

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Jason Yates