WATCH: Sen. Cory Booker Urges Black Churches to Mobilize Voters for Midterms in Speech at Progressive National Baptist Convention

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) on Wednesday addressed the Progressive National Baptist Convention being held this week at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. — TRIBUNE PHOTO BY SAMARIA BAILEY
U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) on Wednesday addressed the Progressive National Baptist Convention being held this week at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. — TRIBUNE PHOTO BY SAMARIA BAILEY

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) urged attendees at the Progressive National Baptist Convention to use their faith to change the country, with his words coming on the third day of the organization’s 57th annual session on Wednesday.

Throughout the week, pastors and lecturers from across the country will deliver sermons and speeches on social justice and the church during the meeting at the Marriott hotel in downtown Philadelphia.

Booker’s remarks preceded a PNBC workshop titled “Preparing Your Church for November 6 Midterm Election Turnout,” which aims to provide strategies for churches to increase turnout and reduce voter suppression.

“We are in a time of moral crisis and I don’t want people to get it confused — this crisis is not about one individual or someone who might be in the office of the presidency,” said Booker.

“I was taught to vilify no man, to love thy neighbor without exception,” he said. “We are in a crisis not because of this electoral moment. But we know in our communities that the crisis we face is a crisis of injustice that has been persistent years before this president was elected.”

Booker pointed to the gap of America’s promise and its reality, which he described as a “sin,” stating that the country tolerates “the highest child poverty levels in the industrial world, environmental injustices that should not be tolerated in our communities, and the highest incarceration rates of all (nations on) planet Earth.”

He also highlighted the issues affecting the impoverished communities: gun violence becoming increasingly problematic, full-time workers needing to use food stamps and bottled water being used at schools because of a lead contamination in the plumbing.

Still, Booker pushed hope, stressing that the power to change these problems lies in voting.

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SOURCE: Samaria Bailey
The Philadelphia Tribune