Keelan Cook Warns Overseas Missions Does Not Solve Problems With Porn

Let me just come out and say it: pornography is a problem that impacts the mission field. In our #MeToo era, we’re used to seeing web articles speaking of the dangers of pornography. We hear — and it is most certainly true — that pornography is both the result of and fuel for the objectification of humanity.

Pornography makes another human less like a person and more like a snack. And yet, so often our recent reminders on the internet about the dangers of, well, the internet and other peddlers of this smut focus on that young man alone in his bedroom late at night. However, the grip of pornography reaches into more than teenage bedrooms. Today, pornography reaches as far as the curse is found. It reaches to the very ends of the earth.

Overseas missions isn’t an escape from pornography.

The false promise of escape

I’m no stranger to awkward conversations, staring across the table, as a student or church member confesses to an ongoing struggle and hearing of their hope that missionary service might provide freedom. Ensnared is the right word for pornography.

Christian men (and many women) ensnared in an addiction to pornography feel trapped. Caged animals instinctively look for an escape, and so it is with Christians caught in the trap of pornography. Subtly, the Enemy’s tactic turns a person’s gaze away from the things that provide real freedom toward other avenues of escape.

Christian missions overseas can be seen as just such an escape.

For some, the thought of some mistakenly “extra Christian” service begins to look like a doorway to a new life, a new chapter without the shackles of pornography (or any other gripping moral compromise). Perhaps it’s the change in vocation. They are convinced that a focus on missions, evangelism, and church planting — all holy pursuits — will drown out the siren song of pornography.

For others, it’s the change in location that makes missions so compelling as a means of escape. Surely secluding oneself in a remote corner of the earth will remove the temptation of ever-present internet access.

Finally, there is the assumption that such a radical adjustment, selling one’s possessions and giving over to a life of sacrifice, provides the hope of escape. After all, such devotion to Christ and his Gospel must result in a life free of these temptations.

Click here to read more.
Source: Baptist Press