Historic: U.S. Embassy in Israel Moves to Jerusalem On Monday

A new road sign and flags are placed at the road leading to the U.S. consulate in the Jewish neighborhood of Arnona on the East-West Jerusalem line in Jerusalem, May 8, 2018.
A new road sign and flags are placed at the road leading to the U.S. consulate in the Jewish neighborhood of Arnona on the East-West Jerusalem line in Jerusalem, May 8, 2018.

On Monday, May 14th, the United States Embassy in Israel will move to Jerusalem, the official capital of the Jewish state. The event happens seventy years to the day after President Harry Truman, in 1948, made the U.S. the first nation to recognize the sovereignty of modern Israel.

President Trump campaigned on the promise of establishing the embassy there, despite warnings from experts and advisers that the event would spark another bloody intifada. America’s embassy in Israel has been situated in Tel Aviv to prevent another such uprising from Palestinians who desire Jerusalem for the capital of a future state.

According to Israeli law passed in 1980, “Jerusalem, complete and united, is the capital of Israel… the seat of the President of the State, the Knesset, the Government and the Supreme Court.”

The event on Monday will be historic. According to ABC News:

Hundreds of guests are invited for the official opening. The embassy event will begin at 4 p.m. local time, and U.S. Ambassador to Israel David Friedman, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and U.S. Deputy Secretary of State John J. Sullivan will speak. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin and Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump will also be attending the ceremony.

Sixty-five journalists from the United States, 41 from the U.K. and more than 60 from the European Union have already arrived in the past week alone to cover the event, according to Israel’s Government Press Office, and more are expected to arrive before the inaugural opening.

Meanwhile, Israel will also celebrate 70 years as an independent state.

U.S. officials from Tel Aviv will move into a U.S. consulate building in Jerusalem which will serve as the embassy until a new building can be built, a process expected to take up to ten years.

–Joshua James