Maureen Callahan: The post-Weinstein Golden Globes Was An Exercise in Hypocrisy

Kirk Douglas (left) is honored at the 2018 Golden Globes. Getty Images)
Kirk Douglas (left) is honored at the 2018 Golden Globes. Getty Images)llywoo

by Maureen Callahan

And the award for ultimate hypocrisy goes to . . . the Hollywood class of 2018.

This year’s Golden Globes were meant to be a defiant, vibrant celebration of a post-Weinstein industry, an awards ceremony about so much more than meaningless awards. We were promised a reckoning, the leveling of a male-dominated industry that institutionalized the rape, abuse and harassment of women for decades.

Like so much Hollywood product, advance buzz was greatly exaggerated. Not one actor or actress, on the red carpet or on stage, made direct reference to their industry’s greatest monster — the one they boast of slaying yet still want to appease.

Host Seth Meyers, in his opening monologue, was the only person in the room to mention him by name.

“Harvey Weinstein can’t be here tonight because, well, I’ve heard rumors that he’s crazy and difficult to work with,” Meyers said. “But don’t worry — he’ll be back in 20 years when he becomes the first person ever booed during the ‘In Memoriam’ segment.”

And how did these brave, crusading, black-garbed, pin-wearing celebrities respond? They booed.

Same when Meyers made a crack about the disgraced Kevin Spacey fumbling a Southern accent. “Oh, is that too mean?” Meyers asked incredulously. “To Kevin Spacey?”

Even a tame Woody Allen joke fell flat. It seems there’s no sexual predator who still doesn’t get Hollywood’s sympathy.

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SOURCE: New York Post