What Do White Christians in Alabama Really Think of Roy Moore?

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, greets supporter Patricia Jones, right, before his election party, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala.(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, greets supporter Patricia Jones, right, before his election party, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala.(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Ground zero for spiritual politics this fall is Alabama, where Roy Moore, paladin of the religious right, is seeking Jeff Sessions’ old seat in the U.S. Senate. You figure that Moore, the Republican in the race, would walk into office pretty comfortably.

So it comes as something of a surprise that the latest poll, from Fox News, shows him tied with Democrat Doug Jones, a former U.S. Attorney who successfully prosecuted two Ku Klux Klan members for their roles in the notorious 1963 16th Street Baptist Church bombing.

But Moore, whose defiance of federal court orders led to his being twice forced out of office as the state’s chief justice, is pretty far out even for Alabama. If you look carefully, you can see that even white evangelicals have their doubts about the guy who planted a Ten Commandments monument in the state judicial building and ordered probate judges not to hand out marriage licenses.

To be sure, Moore wins the support of white evangelicals by a wide margin, 68 percent to 17 percent. But of those that support him, 41 percent do so “with reservations.” Less than half (49 percent) support him “strongly.”

Click here to continue reading…

SOURCE: Mark Silk  
Religion News Service