Silicon Valley Escalates War On White Supremacy: But is it Overstepping the Bounds of Free Speech?

Tech companies such as PayPal are now reversing their hands-off approach about content supported by their services and making it much more difficult for “alt-right” groups to reach mass audiences. (Jeff Chiu/Associated Press)
Tech companies such as PayPal are now reversing their hands-off approach about content supported by their services and making it much more difficult for “alt-right” groups to reach mass audiences. (Jeff Chiu/Associated Press)

Silicon Valley significantly escalated its war on white supremacy this week, choking off the ability of hate groups to raise money online, removing them from Internet search engines, and preventing some sites from registering at all.

The new moves go beyond censoring individual stories or posts. Tech companies such as Google, GoDaddy and PayPal are now reversing their hands-off approach about content supported by their services and making it much more difficult for alt-right organizations to reach mass audiences.

But the actions are also heightening concerns over how tech companies are becoming the arbiters of free speech in America. And in response, right-wing technologists are building parallel digital services that cater to their own movement.

Gab.ai, a social network for promoting free speech, was founded in August 2016 by Silicon Valley engineers alienated by the region’s liberalism. Other conservatives have founded Infogalactic, a Wikipedia for the alt-right, as well as crowdfunding tools Hatreon and WeSearchr. The latter was used to raise money for James Damore, a white engineer who was fired after criticizing Google’s diversity policy.

“If there needs to be two versions of the Internet so be it,” Gab.ai tweeted Wednesday morning. The company’s spokesman, Utsav Sanduja, later warned of a “revolt” in Silicon Valley against the way tech companies are trying to control the national debate.

“There will be another type of Internet who is run by people politically incorrect, populist, and conservative,” Sanduja said.

Some adherents to the alt-right — a fractious coalition of neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and those opposed to feminism — said in interviews they will press for the federal government to step in and regulate Facebook and Google, an unexpected stance for a movement that is skeptical of government meddling.

“Doofuses in the conservative movement say it’s only censorship if the government does it,” said Richard Spencer, an influential white nationalist. “YouTube and Twitter and Facebook have more power than the government. If you can’t host a website or tweet, then you effectively don’t have a right to free speech.”

He added “social networks need to be regulated in the way the broadcast networks are. I believe one has a right to a Google profile, a Twitter profile, an accurate search … We should start conceiving of these thing as utilities and not in terms of private companies.”

Click here to continue reading…

SOURCE: Tracy Jan and Elizabeth Dwoskin 
The Washington Post