Black Guns Matter Founder, Maj Toure, says Arming Law-Abiding Blacks Would Help Cut Down On Violence in Black Communities

Maj Toure of Black Guns Matter with Louis Evans, a former police officer and shooting range owner, at a Black Guns Matter event in Compton

Maj Toure of Black Guns Matter with Louis Evans, a former police officer and shooting range owner, at a Black Guns Matter event in Compton

A gun activist is working to make sure black gun owners in Detroit know the laws and their rights.

But not everyone is enthused about his cause.

You could call Maj Toure a gun rights evangelist and the founder of “Black Guns Matter” brought his message to Detroit – he told a crowd of roughly 40 people guns and freedom go hand in hand.

“When you have people that are armed, informed, safe responsible citizens, they maintain their destiny a little bit differently,” Toure said. “They don’t want to be controlled the same because they can defend the things they believe in.”

Toure is not your typical pro-gunner. He became an activist in his home town of north Philadelphia after watching friends who bought guns legally get arrested and charged with felonies for carrying them illegally.

They were ignorant of gun laws and their rights, he said.

“We figure if we start informing people on what exactly is going on, we can fix that,” said Toure said.

He’s taking that information to inner cities around the country, schooling the public on gun safety gun rights and gun laws – beginning with gun control.

“It’s based in racism,” Toure said. “All gun control laws are created out of emancipation. People of African descent in America became free; we need to come up with a separate set of rules for those people that were abused tremendously.”

FOX 2 caught up with pastors and activists reverends David Bullock and Charles Williams III. They have differing views on Black Guns Matter movement.

“More guns means, more violence. More violence, more carnage,” Williams said. “We don’t need more carnage; we need more people who are protected by police.”

“Under this Trump era whether its violence in urban Detroit, urban Chicago, urban Flint or Dylan Roof’s friends and family program, black folks need to think about what it means to protect themselves if law enforcement can’t,” Bullock said.

And the people are listening.

Kristen Branch abhorred guns before showing up at Friday night’s meeting, but that may be changing.

FOX 2: “Do you think you would get a gun now?”

“Possibly,” Branch said. “I want to be 100 percent sure what I am getting myself into.”

SOURCE: Randy Wimbley 
Fox 2 Detroit