Sudanese Christians Celebrate Trump’s Victory

In this Oct. 18, 2016 file photo, internally displaced children play at Saint Mary camp, which has been set up near a cemetery in Juba, South Sudan.
In this Oct. 18, 2016 file photo, internally displaced children play at Saint Mary camp, which has been set up near a cemetery in Juba, South Sudan.

Streets were jammed with people. Holding fists in the air, marching, they chanted and shouted. The demonstrations began soon after Donald J. Trump won the election.

This was not a protest mob sponsored by Socialist Advantage or George Soros’ MoveOn.org — whichever rent-a-riot/anarchism-orgy you prefer to credit — lining the streets of Philadelphia, Seattle, Boston, Portland, Oakland, California, Chicago and New York City burning American flags, perpetrating and/or threatening violence and revolution.

This was a celebration — a sigh of relief after a long period of holding one’s breath — expressed in Juba, South Sudan. Those that had feared that the next President of the United States would be Hillary Clinton were dancing in the streets, chanting “USA, USA” and “Trump Oyee!”

Wednesday morning I heard from Sudanese and South Sudanese friends. Some were U.S. citizens that voted for Trump because they believed Hillary Clinton would have followed the Obama Administration’s tolerance towards Sudan’s genocidal Caliphate-building Islamist regime. They believed she would also show tolerance, even support, towards those working to undermine South Sudan’s security and stability.

Other Sudanese Trump supporters are resident aliens. They couldn’t vote, but all believe Trump will stop the U.S. policy treating victims and perpetrators with disastrous moral equivalence in Sudan and will expose false narratives about South Sudan that demonize leaders and excuse the corruption and treason of the power-hungry.

A friend calling from Juba said, “Congratulations, my sister! We are very happy for the election of Donald Trump!” “Close your eyes and picture the streets of Juba.” He described the above scene, so different from the angry, obscene riots on American streets. This man lived in the United States for many years and became a U.S. citizen before returning to South Sudan to help build his nation. He reminded me that the Comprehensive Peace Agreement that stopped Khartoum’s active war on southern Sudan and led to the creation of the new nation “was a Republican project.” Now, he said, it is time for Republicans to continue the project and help South Sudan become a full-fledged democracy, prosperous nation, and strong ally against Islamic supremacism and global jihad.

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SOURCE: The Stream
Faith Mcdonnell