Pastor Michael Jones, Rev. Dr. Freddy J. Clark, and Other St. Louis Church Leaders to Join 100 Black Men of Metropolitan St. Louis in Symposium on Black Men and Fatherhood

Photo by Wiley Price Father and son Zion Leon Hite IV enjoys the view of dancers on the shoulders of his father, Leon, during the Dancing in the Streets Festival in Grand Center.
Photo by Wiley Price
Father and son
Zion Leon Hite IV enjoys the view of dancers on the shoulders of his father, Leon, during the Dancing in the Streets Festival in Grand Center.

We respect the potential of the New Year to motivate people to rethink their conduct and resolve to improve it. So we applaud the timing of 100 Black Men of Metropolitan St. Louis in hosting a symposium entitled “The Power of a Man’s Spirit” on Saturday, January 11, from 10 a.m. to noon at Vashon High School, 3035 Cass Ave. The event is free and open to the public. We strongly encourage the public to attend this community forum geared around self-empowerment with a special focus on the latent power of black men.

Several powerful and respected black men in our local clergy have agreed to speak to this important theme at this event on Saturday. The scheduled panelists are Pastor Michael Jones of Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church, the Rev. Dr. Freddy J. Clark of Shalom Church (City of Peace), the Rev. Rodney Francis of Washington Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church and Pastor Aeneas Williams of The Spirit Church. The symposium will be moderated by the Rev. Starsky Wilson of St. John’s United Church of Christ. We have the highest regard for these men and their power to influence our community, including our men, for the better. The American will report in depth on what they have to say online and in next week’s paper, for those unable to attend. We join these clergy leaders in advance in praying for hospitable weather so the largest possible audience will attend.

The goal of this symposium, according to its organizers, is to begin the New Year by providing information to help men of all ages “acknowledge and connect with their spiritual strength.” Our community needs men in touch with their own most powerful positive resources so that they can connect with their family and community. “We hope males become better educated about the importance of having a spirit that encourages and empowers them to lead their families and communities, rather than remaining disengaged and feeling hopelessness,” organizers announced. “A call to action for participants may include reclaiming their rightful place in the family, church and community as dictated by history, scripture, quotes and philosophy.”

Click here to read more

Source: St. Louis American