Hillsdale College Professor Terrence O. Moore says Common Core Is Killing the Nation’s Great Literature

(Photo: The Christian Post/Napp Nazworth) Terrence O. Moore, assistant professor history at Hillsdale College, speaking about Common Core at The Kirby Center of Hillsdale College, Washington, D.C., Jan. 10, 2014.

(Photo: The Christian Post/Napp Nazworth)
Terrence O. Moore, assistant professor history at Hillsdale College, speaking about Common Core at The Kirby Center of Hillsdale College, Washington, D.C., Jan. 10, 2014.

Fewer students will be exposed to the great works of literature, art and music under the Common Core State Standards Initiative, Terrence O. Moore, assistant professor of history at Hillsdale College argues.

The Common Core is an “attempt to take away the great stories of the American people and replace them with the stories that fit the progressive, liberal narrative of the world,” Moore said in a Thursday speech hosted by Hillsdale College in Washington, D.C.

The architects of the Common Core, he said, are “story-killers” because they are “killing the greatest stories of the greatest nation in history.”

Moore researched the Common Core for a recently published book, The Story-Killers: A Common Sense Case Against the Common Core. For that book, Moore looked at the Common Core’s list of suggested readings and textbooks that have been published to align with the Common Core.

In his speech, a video of which will soon be available on the Hillsdale College website, Moore provides many examples of great works of literature that are being removed from school curriculum around the country because of the Common Core.

Plato, Hans Christian Andersen and Benjamin Franklin cannot be found in Common Core readings, for instance. When students do read some of the great works of literature, they tend to be excerpts rather than complete works, supplemented with modern commentary on the works. The great works of literature are also being replaced by “informational texts” and recent articles written by journalists.

For one example, Moore found a lesson on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. In that lesson, students are not asked to actually read Frankenstein. Rather, they read three and half pages of Shelley writing about what it was like to write Frankenstein. Then they read five pages from a modern author writing about scary stories, with no mention of Frankenstein. Then they read five and a half pages of a script from a Saturday Night Live skit aboutFrankenstein.

In that skit, Frankenstein’s monster calls everyone a “fascist.” The teacher’s manual tells the teacher to explain the word “fascist” to the class and how the word has come to refer to any “right wing extremist group.”

The purpose of education, according to the Common Core, is “college and career readiness” and “21st century literacy” for a “global economy.”

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Source: Christian Post | NAPP NAZWORTH


  

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